Hogan's Heroes

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Character mistake: In several scenes all over the show (though not always!), characters use the command "Raus!" to send somebody away from somewhere. Raus, short for "heraus" literally means "out" in the sense of "out of a building", which would be "aus einem Gebäude heraus" in German. Used as a command, it always means "get out", never "get away from there" or "get lost", in other words, the addressee must be inside of somewhere to be ordered "Raus." One example would be Schultz sending the prisoners away from general Burkhalter's car in S05E13.

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Character mistake: During the opening scene of every episode, Klink comes out of his office and salutes. Then it cuts to Sgt. Shultz who then salutes. The superior officer never salutes first, it's a sign of respect of rank. There is one exception for this in the American military where if the soldier is a Medal Of Honor recipient, the superior officer will usually salute first but is not required to.

terry s

Reservations Are Required - S1-E15

Character mistake: In this episode, Hogan suggests a helicopter as means for escape from Stalag 13. As a matter of fact, the allies had no helicopters operational before April 1944. The famous R-4 made its first flight only in January 1942. So unless Hogan planned to steal one of the Luftwaffe's 20 FW Drache (a maximum of ten or so existing at any given time) or a whole bunch of the single-seat Flettner Kolibri (24 total built) he was out of luck.

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Happy Birthday, Adolf - S1-E17

Character mistake: The artillery officer asks "Does headquarters expect a squad of infantry to replace experienced artillery men?" Hogan only offered "his detachment", and he's wearing a Luftwaffe uniform (and so is LeBeau). Why does the artillery officer get the idea that the "detachment" would be infantry, that is to say, ground forces (Heer) troops? To avoid confusion: Yes, the Luftwaffe did have infantry units, but those would be viewed by other branches as Luftwaffe guards primarily, not as infantry.

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The 43rd, a Moving Story - S1-E23

Character mistake: When Klink explains the route of the trucks carrying the red cross packages to Kühn, he for once uses a map actually showing Germany. Unfortunately, the places he points to start near Luxemburg and track all across Germany. The spot he places Hammelburg at would be near Poznan in Poland.

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Request Permission to Escape - S1-E32

Character mistake: When ordering Schultz to finish cleaning his car, Klink salutes Schultz, his returning the salute with the garden hose in his hand leads to Klink being soaked. A salute is, except in rare circumstances, always initiated by the lower-ranking individual and returned by his superior, not the other way round. This rule is broken especially by Klink in several other places as well.

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Suggested correction: The Heroes used all of these codenames. Papa Bear is the codename of Hogan himself, Goldilocks is the codename of the whole team around Hogan, and Mama Bear is the codename of the U-Boat they're in contact with.

Operation Briefcase - S2-E4

Character mistake: As Stauffen parts company with Col. Hogan at the road checkpoint, he salutes Hogan. While that is understandable under the circumstances - after all Hogan just saved his life, it would also be highly suspicious. Both Schultz and Stauffen's adjutant were watching them, so it can't be said they did it surreptitiously either. After all, Stauffen is a German general whereas Hogan is an allied prisoner officer of inferior rank. For an officer of higher rank to initiate the salute is a demonstration of great respect and/or thanks, which, as far as anyone besides Stauffen and Hogan knew, was not warranted in this situation.

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Clearance Sale at the Black Market - S4-E1

Character mistake: When Hogan addresses him, Major Kiegel sends the girls away from his table by saying "Raus!" The word "raus" used as an imperative literally means "out" in the sense of "leave the room" - he would be ordering the girls to leave the tavern, or at least the tap room in this case. It's not correct German to use it to send somebody away from a table.

Bad Day in Berlin - S4-E11

Character mistake: After Le Beau is questioned, Schultz is told to take him back to his cell. Schultz calls "About face! Forward march!" The "about face" is wrong. The door that Le Beau goes out is on his right, therefore the command should have been "right face."

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The Antique - S5-E12

Character mistake: Schultz states "In Hammelburg, they call me die Glitterzehe", which is a literal (but wrong) translation of the term "twinkle toes." That term does not exist in German, and even if it did, it would have to be GlitZerzehe, because the German word for twinkling is 'glitzern', the word 'glittern' does not exist.

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Six Lessons from Madame LaGrange - S5-E22

Character mistake: The SS guard salutes Major Hochstetter with his palm out, in the British fashion. Firstly, German soldiers salute palm-down, secondly, by the Wehrmacht (and SS) military protocol, he should just click his heels and not salute at all when receiving an order.

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Trivia: A sinister aspect of an otherwise lightheated comedy, but the fact is that Hogan and his men are war criminals. They engage in combat activities behind enemy lines when not in uniform, and worse, while wearing enemy uniforms. The Germans tried that during the Battle of the Bulge and those arrested were shot.

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Answer: Nimrod's actual identity was never revealed in the series. It was only known that he was a British intelligence agent. Nimrod was not Colonel Klink. Hogan had only implied it was him as a ruse to get Klink returned as camp commandant, not wanting him replaced by someone more competent who would impede the Heroes war activities. (As another contributor previously posted, the term "nimrod" is slang for a nerdy, doofus type of person, though it's unclear why that was his code name).

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