Dexter

Dexter (2006)

2 corrected entries in season 3

(15 votes)

The Damage a Man Can Do - S3-E8

Corrected entry: Batista arrives at the office and after a short exchange with Deb and Quinn about his relationship with Detective Gianna, he greets Laguerta with "Mornin' Lu". The clock on the wall indicates it is 1:35 in the afternoon.

Correction: This could just as easily be a character mistake. Maybe it really IS 1:35pm, but Batista just doesn't know what time it is.

Correction: Debra wouldn't have a laminate. Even though she hadn't earned her shield, she would still have a badge.

Do You Take Dexter Morgan? - S3-E12

Other mistake: The marriage certificate for Rita's first marriage shows her date of birth as 04-19-1989 and Dexter states she married at 16. The marriage date is 08-16-1989, when she would have been 4 months old. She also would only be 17 at the start of the series (2006) if she was born in 1989. (00:13:45)

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Those Kinds of Things - S6-E1

[MC Hammer's "U Can't Touch This" playing.]
Former Classmate: Come on, Dexter. It's hammer time.
Dexter: [internally] I have no idea what hammer time is. Or how it differs from regular time.

Bishop73

More quotes from Dexter

My Bad - S5-E1

Trivia: When Dexter and Debra walk into her apartment, on the side of the fridge you see a take-out flyer that reads "killer menu."

Bishop73

More trivia for Dexter

About Last Night - S3-E9

Question: Dexter tests the blood on Miguel's shirt, to see if it's Freebo's. It looks like he's just using a DNA sequencer and the blood result comes back "bovine." Can a DNA sequencer differentiate which species the blood came from like that? Or perhaps he was using a different type of blood analysis machine? Is there an analysis machine that's capable of that? I thought the way to test if blood is human or not, "anti-human serum" is mixed with the blood to see if it will clot. So wouldn't the only way to tell it was bovine blood is to inject it with "anti-bovine serum"?

Bishop73

Answer: The short answer is yes, it could. but, it would have to be set up to analyze results to differentiate species. The sequencer will report the base pairs for any properly prepared sample, but interpreting the results is a software package. The software is available, but I would think it unlikely that an analysis package used in a forensics lab would have the capability to be so specific. More likely it would report "Non Human Sequences Found."

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