The Man From U.N.C.L.E.

The Quadripartite Affair - S1-E3

Plot hole: Solo blows open the ceiling vent of Illya and Marion's cell, and she stands on Illya's shoulders until Solo can reach her and pull her out. This leaves Illya with nothing/no one to stand on, no way to reach the vent and no apparent way out of the cell. But he's out just the same in the next scene, with no explanation as to how. (00:42:40)

Jean G

The Four-Steps Affair - S1-E21

Revealing mistake: Solo is driving on a country road through a wooded area with no street lights. So what are all those bright round lights reflecting on the hood and windshield of his car? UFOs? (00:10:10)

Jean G

The Neptune Affair - S1-E11

Revealing mistake: Every time the villains' deadly gas, "hydro," is mentioned, the word is badly and very obviously dubbed in, and doesn't match what the actors' lips are saying. This occurred because the original name used, "freon," turned out to be an existing (and patented) refrigerant gas, so the name had to be changed to avoid a trademark lawsuit. (00:28:45)

Jean G

The Project Strigas Affair - S1-E9

Continuity mistake: When Danfield opens the briefcase, the bundles of money inside are disarrayed, and he jumbles them further. A few shots later, though he hasn't touched them again, they've straightened themselves into nice, neat piles. (00:29:45)

Jean G

The Foreign Legion Affair - S2-E22

Continuity mistake: When Solo begins trying to seduce the dancing girl with the line, "We shall taste paradise," he's standing at least a foot away from her. But in the very next shot, they're suddenly in a clinch: her hands are on his cheeks and they're about to kiss. (00:29:15)

Jean G

The Yellow Scarf Affair - S1-E17

Plot hole: The typewriter case containing the secret plans is said to be boobytrapped with nitroglycerine. If dropped, says the Thrush agent, it "could blow us all up." Yet it survives a plane crash intact and is later wielded as a club several times in the cavern fight scene, and somehow it never explodes. (00:43:05)

Jean G

The Apple A Day Affair - S3-E27

Revealing mistake: Gardner and Illya are chained to a mine shaft post and the Thrush bad guys trigger a cave-in to seal them in. As the debris falls, you can see the entire "stone" wall behind them rock and wobble flimsily from side to side. (00:23:50)

Jean G

The Four-Steps Affair - S1-E21

Continuity mistake: In Waverly's office at the beginning, the contemplative Illya's hand is draped over his glasses salute-fashion in wide shot. But in close-up, it's suddenly curled into a fist at the side of his head. Next shot, he's "saluting" again. (00:06:50)

Jean G

The Green Opal Affair - S1-E6

Continuity mistake: In Waverly's office, Illya hones his combat skills by swinging at a suspended wooden block with a baseball bat. When the alarm goes off, Illya puts the bat down on the table, and he and Solo rush to the computer console. In the next, reverse angle shot, the block is still hanging from the ceiling, but the baseball bat has vanished from the table.

Jean G

The Neptune Affair - S1-E11

Revealing mistake: Here, in the opening scenes at U.N.C.L.E. headquarters, as well as in a number of other first season episodes, the unmarried Illya is inexplicably wearing a wedding ring. (00:02:35)

Jean G

Napoleon Solo: My name is Napoleon Solo. I'm an enforcement agent in Section Two here. That's operations and enforcement.
Illya Kuryakin: I am Illya Kuryakin. I am also an enforcement agent. Like my friend Napoleon, I go and I do whatever I am told to by our chief.
Alexander Waverly: Hmm? Oh, yes. Alexander Waverly. Number One in Section One. In charge of this, our New York headquarters. It's from here that I send these young men on their various missions.

More quotes from The Man From U.N.C.L.E.

Trivia: "The Man From U.N.C.L.E.'s" original working title was "Solo," and its lead character was named for a spy with a minor role in one of Ian Fleming's early Bond novels. U.N.C.L.E. producer Norman Felton had a handshake agreement with Fleming to use the name and to develop "Solo" as a TV spy series. But the Bond film franchise had other ideas, reneged on the agreement on Fleming's behalf, and sued, forcing the title change. Felton prevailed only in retaining the character's name: Napoleon Solo.

Jean G

More trivia for The Man From U.N.C.L.E.

Answer: He must have ridden in an Eaton's store elevator while he was in Canada at some point. For some reason, this elevator reminds him of it. The show's original concept had Solo being a Canadian, so this may be a minor nod to that fact.

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