Doctor Who

Chosen answer: We see clips from The Invasion of Time, The Five Doctors, Arc of Infinity and DragonFire.

Repo_Man

Chosen answer: In one way or another, eight times. He dies twice in the episode "Amy's Choice", once in each of the two dreams, firstly killed by an Eknodine in the Leadworth version of the dream, then again when the Doctor blew up the TARDIS in the other dream to allow them to escape it. He's then killed by the Silurian Restac in "Cold Blood", shortly before his body is consumed by the cracks in time, erasing him from history completely. He returns as an Auton duplicate, restored from Amy's memory, in "The Pandorica Opens" - this duplicate is destroyed in "The Big Bang" when the universe is reset, although some memories live on in the human Rory recreated in the rebooted universe. He died again in "The Curse of the Black Spot", but was successfully resuscitated by Amy. He's seen to die of old age in "The Angels Take Manhattan", then kills himself in the same episode by jumping from a high roof (as does Amy) to set up a paradox to eliminate the Angel threat. He then finally dies off-camera at the age of 82 after having been sent back in time by a surviving Angel, having lived out a long and happy life with Amy.

Tailkinker Premium member

Chosen answer: It was written on the plastic bassinet. She could have seen it or asked at any time Amy was their prisoner.

Captain Defenestrator

Chosen answer: This happened during the events of the 1975 story, "Terror of the Zygons".

Tailkinker Premium member

Chosen answer: This is an instance of the Doctor interfering, albeit indirectly, with his own timestream. He sends the invites to his younger self, Rory, Amy, River and the older Canton because he knows, from his memories of those events occurring, that they are the ones who get invited. It's a somewhat circular situation, but that's time travel for you.

Tailkinker Premium member

Flesh and Stone (2) - S5-E5

Question: What did Amy mean when in response to "You'd slow us down, Miss Pond," she replies "I don't want to sound selfish, but you'd really speed me up"?

Shadow5

Chosen answer: With the rest of the group she would be moving faster then she would if she were alone.

MasterOfAll

Chosen answer: It's not so much that they're necessarily competing (indeed, the Doctor would be appalled to think that they were), it's really just that Amy has, at this point in the series, rather conflicted feelings about the Doctor and Rory. While on the verge of marrying the dependable everyman Rory, she feels an attraction to the Doctor, his exciting life and offbeat ways. As a result of this episode, she comes to realise that she does truly love Rory.

Tailkinker Premium member

Army of Ghosts (1) - S2-E15

Question: When Rose is snooping around after having put on the white coat, she passes a few fire extinguishers in a hall. In the room with the Void Sphere, there's another one. But they're all silver. I may just not be worldly enough, but I've only ever seen red fire extinguishers. Are they like that in the UK, or is it a Doctor Who thing?

Knever

Chosen answer: It's a Doctor Who thing, fire extinguishers in the UK have been red since 1997. Before then different colours represented different contents (water, foam, etc.), but it's unlikely the extinguishers seen would be that old.

pinkwafer

Chosen answer: He doesn't know his own future. She might die or he might regenerate before he sees her again.

Captain Defenestrator

Chosen answer: Angels Take Manhattan takes place in Amy and Rory's personal timelines after they experience the events of The Doctor's visits. When the Angels take someone, they consume all of that person's potential temporal energy after that point, so they'd already had those experiences with The Doctor before being taken.

Captain Defenestrator

Chosen answer: The show, at the time, was suffering badly in the ratings, mainly from a poor time slot, which put it directly up against a highly popular soap opera. The series was also going through something of a bad patch anyway - Colin Baker had proved controversial as the sixth Doctor, leading to his eventual dismissal from the role, a prior eighteen month hiatus had lowered public interest, and a number of issues behind the scenes were deemed to have had a detrimental effect on script quality. While things arguably improved somewhat in the final couple of series with Sylvester McCoy's seventh Doctor, the damage was done and, although pre-production work had already started on the next series, the decision was taken to suspend production.

Tailkinker Premium member

Show generally

Question: This is actually for Doctor 1 but I couldn't find it anywhere. I heard it somewhere that they were going to do only 10 series, but when Doctor 1 fell ill they put in the idea he can regenerate. Is this true? Also is this why a lot of the later episodes were destroyed?

Shadow5

Chosen answer: The show was intended to be ongoing, with no particular plan as to how many series might be involved. But you are indeed correct that William Hartnell's failing health was the principal factor that led to the concept of the regeneration being introduced, with Hartnell himself suggesting Patrick Troughton as his successor, a suggestion that was taken up. This is not, however, why many episodes from that era are missing. At the time, it simply wasn't standard policy to keep episodes indefinitely after transmission, due to the limitations in storage space, and thus many early episodes were simply wiped.

Tailkinker Premium member

Show generally

Question: My understanding of The Daleks is that they draw their power from their vertical shoulder slats. The new paradigm Daleks have no shoulder slats, so where are they drawing their power from?

Josman

Chosen answer: Don't know where you got that information from, but there doesn't seem to be much around to support it. Models of Dalek shown in very early episodes of the original series got their power from external sources, but since then they have operated entirely on unspecified internal power sources concealed within their armour. No reason to think that the new Daleks are any different.

Tailkinker Premium member

Chosen answer: As revealed in "The End of Time" it was the President of the Time Lords who put the drumming back in time into the Master's head.

Chosen answer: He burned Nero's original plans for his New Rome, inspiring Nero to burn down Rome to rebuild.

Captain Defenestrator

Chosen answer: Well they are Time Lords, they can manipulate Time itself to some extent so bringing people back from death wherever or however it happens.

Repo_Man

Chosen answer: The Cybermen have a misplaced belief that all other life forms want to be upgraded. He can probably work out, from scaning the Dalek, that it is a powerful war machine and thus useful in subduing the humans. Once that's done, they could reward the Daleks by upgrading them.

Josman

Chosen answer: I think that looking into the Untempered Schism shows the young Time Lords infinity. It shows them everything, and it is like a test. If they can resist the urge to grab it and take it all for themselves, then they are worthy to be a Time Lord.

Chosen answer: This is unanswered. Hopefully, during the Christmas special of 2009, it will be answered, as it brings back the Master.

JonTheRandom

Answer: A member of a cult the Master set up to get himself resurrected, as shown in "The End of Time."

Show generally

Question: What exactly made Jack Harkness immortal? I know Rose brought him back to life, but how? The Doctor mentions something about him being a fixed point in time and space, but what exactly does that mean?

Socks1000

Chosen answer: In the series 1 episode 'The Parting on the Ways', Rose stared directly into the heart of the TARDIS which infused her with the time vortex. This power enabled her to disintegrate the Daleks and also allowed her to bring Jack back to life. However, Rose was not fully aware of how her powers worked and by bringing Jack back she also removed his ability to die. The Doctor referring to Jack as "a fixed point in space and time" refers to the fact that Jack cannot be removed from existance through death as a normal person could.

The Impossible Planet (1) - S2-E11

Factual error: The Doctor (and the staff on the station) refer to the idea of a planet being in orbit around a black hole as 'impossible'. It is not. Gravity (and physics in general) works perfectly well outside of the event horizon. For all practical purposes - regarding orbiting around it - the black hole might as well be any other object, as long as it has an equal mass. (00:07:15 - 00:08:30)

More mistakes in Doctor Who

The Satan Pit (2) - S2-E12

Doctor: So, that's the trap. Or the test or the final judgment, I don't know. But if I kill you, I kill her. Except that implies, in this big grand scheme of Gods and Devils, that she's just a victim. But I've seen a lot of this universe. I've seen fake gods and bad gods and demi-gods and would-be gods - out of all that - out of that whole pantheon - if I believe in one thing... Just one thing... I believe in her.

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