Cheers

The Bartender's Tale - S3-E23

Revealing mistake: When Frasier comes into the chalet after skiing he doesn't show any of the visible effects after a hard day on the slopes. Meaning, his face isn't even flushed from the cold, his hair is perfectly combed after wearing a hat and there is not even a drop of snow on his boots.

Tobin OReilly

No Contest - S1-E18

Revealing mistake: The photographs and news items relating to the Boston Barmaid Contest have been clumsily pasted onto a real newspaper. The paper upon which they were printed is cleaner and whiter than the off-white newsprint and the photographs have much greater contrast.

What's Up, Doc? - S7-E18

Plot hole: At closing time, Cliff, Norm and Woody spontaneously decide to go to Cliff's house. Sam then enters the bar after his date at Melville's. Later in the scene, Rebecca asks Sam about the 'Three Stooges', to which Sam sarcastically replies that they went to Cliff's house. But how could he possibly know that since he entered the scene after they had already left.

More mistakes in Cheers

Woody: Jack Frost nipping at your toes, Mr. Peterson?
Norm: Yeah, now let's get Joe Beer nipping at my liver.

More quotes from Cheers

Trivia: The portrait of Geronimo hanging in the bar was a tribute to Nicholas Colasanto after he died. The portrait originally hung in his dressing room.

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Show generally

Question: Does anyone know whether the coloured-in photos, which appear throughout the opening titles sequence, are real or made up for the show? If they ARE real, when George Wendt's name appears there's a shot of a man holding a newspaper with 'WE WIN' as the headline - does anybody know what this referred to?

Chimera

Answer: Here is the source of the "WE WIN" photo: http://www.oldnycphotos.com/nyny587ac.html Brooklyn, of all places.

Chosen answer: The pictures in the opening sequences are real pictures of people enjoying alcohol (from various dates), and are not meant to represent or include any of the cast members. The "we win" sign (most likely not a newspaper headline) is referring to the end of prohibition (1933) A fitting tribute to a show about drinking alcohol.

The word "Nazi" appears in the caption to a story underneath the headline. Maybe the headline refers to the Nazi surrender.

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