Firefly

Trivia: Nathan Fillion considers this to be the most fun he's had on a television series, and compares every job he gets or has had in the past to it.

Cubs Fan

Trivia: The show's theme song, "The Ballad of Serenity", was written by Joss Whedon.

Cubs Fan

Trivia: Nathan Fillion would hide snacks and drinks on-set (usually in crevices, drawers or just off camera), so they would be readily at hand in-between takes. After learning the series was canceled, he alleges that he purposely hid a half-finished drink in one of the pieces of the set, and never retrieved it, to see if anyone would eventually stumble onto it. He reportedly does not know what became of it, so there's a chance it's still in the set-piece in storage somewhere.

Trivia: Morena Baccarin Inara was originally planned to have a storyline in which it was revealed she was suffering a terminal illness. It is unknown whether or not she would have been permanently killed-off, as the series was canceled before the storyline could begin.

Trivia: Creator Joss Whedon, who is infamous for both killing off his characters and also having characters in relationships "break up", stated that if the series went ahead as planned, Wash and Zoe would have been the only couple in one of his series that would last from the start to the end, because he thought they were perfect together and shouldn't separate.

Trivia: Co-star Summer Glau reportedly flubbed a key line during filming one day at the end of a rather long take, and in frustration, one of the other cast-members (both annoyed but also amused by the flub) exclaimed "Summer!" Everyone on-set found this exclamation so funny, that they would all scream "Summer!" whenever they flubbed a line. Glau was reportedly annoyed by this at first, but later began to find it amusing like the others.

Trivia: If the show wasn't canceled, the contents of the mysterious syringe Inara has in the pilot would have been revealed. It was set to contain a very potent strand of an artificially created STD - non-fatal to Inara, but fatal to anyone who had sexual contact with her within a certain span of time after she injected it. In a planned storyline, Inara would inject herself with it shortly before being captured by a Reaver ship. After the crew of the Firefly breaks onto the Reaver ship to rescue her, they'd find every single Reaver dead, implying that Inara had been assaulted in some way and/or raped by every single one of them. This would then lead into an ongoing character-arc regarding her depression over the assault.

Trivia: Joss Whedon had intended for the series to last seven seasons, and had even come up with plans for the various main season-storylines before the series was canceled. The follow-up movie "Serenity" features a modified and shortened version of what would have been the central storyline for seasons two and three. In addition, "Serenity" also features most of the revelations about River's backstory and abilities that were planned for the rest of the series, such as her being trained to be a living weapon, her unknowingly having learned Alliance secrets, her knowledge of Miranda, her overt psychic abilities, etc.

Trivia: At first Nathan Fillion insisted on doing all his own stunts. However, he discovered his stunt double wasn't being paid since he wasn't technically working, with Fillion doing all the stunts himself. Fillion felt bad for having taken his work, so he began using his stunt double from then on.

TedStixon

Trivia: Reportedly, Mal was originally written with "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" alum Nicholas Brendon in mind, but it quickly became clear that there simply wouldn't be enough time for him to star in both series simultaneously.

TedStixon

Trivia: Had the show continued, Joss Whedon contemplated giving James Marsters a cameo in an episode reprising his role of Spike from "Buffy the Vampire Slayer" and "Angel." It would have been a very quick "blink-and-you'll-miss-it" part, showing Spike sitting at a bar drinking and telling Mal "Nothing ever changes..." as he passes by.

TedStixon

Trivia: One of Joss Whedon's inspirations for the series was the historical Civil War novel "The Killer Angels" by Michael Shaara. The book was also the basis for the 1993 movie "Gettysburg."

TedStixon

Trivia: Executives at Fox took issue with nearly every aspect of the series during production, and caused a great deal of trouble for the creators. For example, Fox attempted to meddle with the story and characters, including attempting to force creator Joss Whedon to rewrite the characters Wash and Zoe so they wouldn't be married. Fox also disliked several of the episodes and aired them completely out of order (including airing the pilot last), making the plot extremely difficult to follow. Episodes were also frequently delayed for sporting events and shifted around, making it hard for fans to watch the series. Finally, Fox attempted to deceptively market the series as a "wacky" and "twisted" sci-fi comedy as opposed to marketing it as the sci-fi drama with comedic elements that it actually was. These are often cited among the many factors that contributed to its early cancellation. However, despite these factors, the series ended up becoming a massive cult hit among sci-fi fans.

TedStixon

Trivia: Early on, there were only meant to be five main characters on the crew. Over time, this increased to nine.

TedStixon

Trivia: Every time Malcolm is riding a horse, no matter what planet he's on, it's always the same horse - a horse called "Fred."

TedStixon

Trivia: In an odd bit of studio meddling that shows how much the network didn't understand the series, Joss Whedon was given the contradictory note that Mal should be a more upbeat, positive character... and that he should also shoot and kill more people.

TedStixon

Trivia: DVDs of "Firefly" and its follow-up movie "Serenity" were brought up to the international space station in 2007 by astronaut Steven Ray Swanson, who is a massive fan of the series. They are reportedly still a permanent fixture in the space station.

TedStixon

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Show generally

Question: I've never seen the show myself, but I was wondering what kind of a name "Inara Serra" is. I'm assuming Inara is of Portuguese origin, but mostly because the actress was born in Brazil. Can someone please help me with this?

Answer: Inara is actually Arabic in origin; it means "ray of light" or alternatively "heaven sent". Serra, on the other hand, is Portuguese and means "mountain range" - derived from the same word in Latin, where it means 'saw' (as in the cutting implement, which a mountain range might resemble, rather than the act of seeing).

Tailkinker Premium member

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