padfootrocksmysocks

Chosen answer: He was offered an extremely lucrative deal to play Gandalf, but turned it down as he didn't want to spend eighteen months in New Zealand making a film that he stated he "didn't understand".

Tailkinker Premium member

27th Sep 2009

Smallville (2001)

Chosen answer: No. Kryptonite as a plot device has changed from "every yahoo can get a chunk at the corner store" to an extremely rare element. It hardly ever shows up anymore. Also it really doesn't need an antidote. So long as it's removed from Superman's vicinity before he dies, he'll recover. Its effects don't linger like radioactive materials do for humans.

Grumpy Scot

Answer: In Smallville, blue kryptonite does makes Kryptonians immune to the effects of green kryptonite. Although it does remove their super power abilities (by making them unable to process the power of the yellow sun). In some versions of the comics, blue kryptonite was the antidote for red kryptonite. In the comics, Supergirl tried to create an antidote to kryptonite which resulted in X-kryptonite.

Bishop73

6th Sep 2009

Supernatural (2005)

Chosen answer: The charm is a male head with bullhorns. In an interview Jensen Ackles claimed that it was an Egyptian protective amulet; however, Egyptian deities are customarily portrayed as having animal heads on human bodies. The bull-man is a demon from Mesopotamian mythology, where he is a protective force against evil and appears as an attendant of the sun god (Samash). His body is human above the waist, and he also has the ears and horns of a bull.

Orsi

Chosen answer: Max is not the children's uncle but a close family friend. He helps the Von Trapps to escape by stalling the announcement the winners of a music concert held at the end. Being the first-place winners, the Von Trapps are announced last, but they have already slipped away into the mountains.

raywest Premium member

27th Aug 2009

General questions

I'm looking for a film I heard about in drama class in high school. It takes place on a steamboat or river paddle boat. The main character is a woman that sings on the boat, but is kicked off for being half black. If this sounds familiar please please please let me know! Thanks.

padfootrocksmysocks

Chosen answer: This is the musical, "Showboat." It was originally a Broadway musical by Jerome Kern and Oscar Hammerstein, based on Edna Ferber's novel set in the late-19th century American south. The character, Julie, is a mulatto who marries a white man, which was illegal. When it is discovered that she is half-black, the couple is arrested. There have been several movie adaptations of Showboat, the most notable being the 1951 MGM version starring Howard Keel, Kathryn Grayson, and Ava Gardner, among others. The 1936 film starring Paul Robeson is more faithful to the original story, however.

raywest Premium member

28th Jun 2009

Doctor Who (2005)

Show generally

Question: Does anyone know why the BBC isn't showing these in the States at the same time they're released in the U.K.? The Christmas Special JUST aired on BBC America on the 27 June. I find it odd that they don't just release them on both stations at the same time.

padfootrocksmysocks

Chosen answer: BBC America is a separate entity. It is not a "station" of BBC. It airs shows from other UK networks (ITV etc). So, for one reason, it must arrange its schedule to show the shows it wants to show. For another reason, the shows shown on BBC in the UK are paid for by taxes on UK TV sets. It wouldn't be very fair for BBC America not to pay for the rights to show the shows after all there are a lot more of us than them. All these payments and broadcast rights must be worked out for every show. In addition, BBC can sell to other networks as well (e.g. Dr Who and Primeval on SyFy, and Dr Who on PBS are generally another year behind BBC America)

Myridon

23rd Jun 2009

X-Men (2000)

Chosen answer: It comes down to the simple fact that Halle Berry can't do accents worth squat. Storm comes from Kenya, so Berry is attempting some form of Kenyan accent in this first movie, but even here it is uneven and inconsistent. The decision was apparently made in 2 and 3 not to use the accent at all.

Garlonuss Premium member

Question: I'm trying to find a specific part of a scene. All I can remember is the background is a forest-type set with possibly ruins or stairs. The four hobbits are there, but they're in their normal street attire. Any help would be appreciated as to which scene this shot is located.

padfootrocksmysocks

Chosen answer: It sounds like a scene in "Return of the King" in the extended version, but it was the TWO hobbits (Merry and Pippin). Frodo & Samwise are still in Mordor trying to destroy the ring. The scene I think you're imagining is where Gandalf and gang come upon the destroyed Two Towers and find Pippin and Merry smoking pipes while sitting on a destroyed tower next to the forest. Hope that helps.

CCARNI Premium member

Question: What was the point of bringing the Elves to the Battle of Helm's Deep? I don't mean in terms of the action of the film - I mean, why would the filmmakers add in something that is completely off the book? Legolas and Gimli frequently comment in the books that they wish their kinsmen would come to help them. Legolas then says that war is raging on their lands, and they will not come. Why have them come in the film?

padfootrocksmysocks

Chosen answer: It's to show that the other races aren't just sitting back and letting the race of Men fight the battles. They could, of course, simply have had Legolas and Gimli saying that their people are fighting elsewhere, much as the books do, but it's more interesting and emphatic to actually show that the elves are participating in the battle against evil, even if it represents a change.

Tailkinker Premium member

5th Apr 2009

Star Wars (1977)

Question: There's a line in this movie - I think - in which Obi-Wan mentions that Yoda was his master. But wasn't Qui-Gon Jin actually Obi-Wan's master?

padfootrocksmysocks

Chosen answer: Yoda isn't mentioned in this film - you're actually thinking of The Empire Strikes Back, but I know the line that you mean - Obi-Wan refers to Yoda as "the Jedi Master who instructed me". While Yoda was not "his" master (as you say, that was Qui-Gon), his description is technically accurate - Yoda is a Jedi Master and, as we see in Attack of the Clones, appears to take responsibility for training the young Jedi hopefuls, the younglings, as they're referred to, so would undoubtedly have had a hand in Kenobi's training at some point.

Tailkinker Premium member

And he was instructed to complete missions by Yoda.

3rd Apr 2009

Supernatural (2005)

Answer: The chosen answer doesn't answer the question at all. It's called a amulet. It burns hot in God's presence which is why Dean and Sam use it later in the series to find God.

Chosen answer: Sam gave it to him as a Christmas present, though it was originally intended for his father. When John didn't show up for Christmas Sam gave it to Dean. This was shown in a flashback in "A Very Supernatural Christmas".

14th Mar 2009

Twilight (2008)

Question: Okay, so this is sort of a book question, but I guess you could apply it to the movie. What do the covers of the books have to do with the stories within the books? Is there any real importance to them? And, why wasn't the book cover used for the cover of the DVD?

padfootrocksmysocks

Chosen answer: The publishers had the ultimate control over the books' cover designs, but according to Stephanie Meyer, the author, the apple on the first book represents the "forbidden fruit" which Bella and Edward's love would certainly be. Meyer is unsure just what the ruffled tulip on Book Two represents (it was the publisher's choice), but it could be about Bella's blossoming from a girl into woman. The red on white color may symbolize the blood vampires need to survive and how that is tied to Bella. The broken ribbon on Book Three represents the choices Bella must make between her love for Edward and her friendship with Jacob, and her ties to both the mortal and immortal worlds. Book Four's cover is a metaphor for Bella's progression throughout the entire saga. She began as the weakest (at least physically, when compared to vampires and werewolves) player on the board: the pawn. She eventually becomes the strongest: the queen. In the end, it's Bella who leads the Cullens to victory.

raywest Premium member

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