Josh West

Question: Whenever we see Sauron aka the Necromancer, he appears to be shadowy. Did he have a physical form during the events of the Hobbit or not?

Josh West

Answer: Sauron did not have a full physical form at this time. He cannot completely reform his physical body until the One Ring is returned to him. The Necromancer is portrayed as "shadowy" in the films to represent the fact that he is not an entirely corporeal being. Sauron at this point was only able to use a fraction of his power, so he was easily cast out of Dol Guldur.

BaconIsMyBFF

17th Jan 2020

Predator (1987)

Question: There is a scene where after Dillon accidentally kicks a log down the hill, Mac says to him, "You're ghosting' us, motherfucker. I don't care who you are back in the world. You give our position one more time, I'll bleed you, real quiet, and leave you here. Got that?" What did he mean by that?

Josh West

Answer: To translate: "Making noise like that could get us killed. I don't care that you're a CIA agent, if you give away our position like that again, I'll kill you quietly and leave your body here. Do you understand?"

BaconIsMyBFF

20th Nov 2019

The Terminator (1984)

Question: What was Kyle Reese using to saw off the butt of his shotgun?

Josh West

Answer: He uses a hacksaw blade that he most likely picked up from somewhere off screen.

Ssiscool Premium member

16th Nov 2019

The Village (2004)

Question: Just asking out of curiosity, but what disorder does Noah suffer from?

Josh West

Answer: It was never specified what disability he was afflicted with.

raywest Premium member

4th Jan 2019

The Mummy (1999)

Question: In the scenes where Rick lights a match to use on a stick of dynamite, he does so by striking the match against either his own ear or the ear of Ardeth Bay. Is there an explanation to how he does this?

Josh West

Answer: He's lighting the match on his beard-stubble by raking it down his face. He's not striking the matches on his ear. It's not practical at all (and in fact, it's basically impossible unless you have beard-stubble like sandpaper), but it's just a cute way for the movie to show how much of a bad-a** he is. In reality behind the scenes, they actually had a strip of matchbox taped to the actor's faces that they were striking the matches on to light them. But with the right camera placement, it looks like they're lighting them on their faces.

TedStixon

Answer: Matches in those days were friction matches, with added red phosphorous so you could light them on basically any surface, as long as you generated enough heat. Some prefer the bottom of their boots, or a wall, but others light them on their own body, or someone else's.

lionhead

Bare skin does not provide the necessary friction to light a match. It's possible to light one using one's fingernail by flicking it hard against the match head, but not with skin. There has to be a hard textured surface to create a spark.

raywest Premium member

Answer: I don't think he was rubbing the match on bare skin, more likely the edge of where the beard grows. The rough hairs would make the area of skin able to produce enough friction to light the match as long as it was rubbed fast enough.

scaryterri Premium member

That is very unlikely, and even if it was possible, it would cause deep pain and injury to the skin.

raywest Premium member

Don't be ridiculous. It's not a sanding stone you are rubbing with, it's just a match.

lionhead

Https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=btTR7-HfM-k.

lionhead

Answer: There's no explanation, but really, this is just a movie invention.

raywest Premium member

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