Goekhan

19th Jun 2019

Inside Man (2006)

Character mistake: The bank robbers send out a hostage and put a drawer around his neck with a note. The drawer is bugged and the bank robbers can monitor the police. The police just leave the drawer lying around on the table for half of the movie inside their mobile headquarters. This drawer should be in a forensic laboratory being checked for fingerprints and similar.

Goekhan

Plot hole: Why do they have to use the Apollo 11 rocket to put the Arc-net into orbit? The MiB seem to be baffled by the task of putting something into space, but aliens in 1969 seem to regularly land on earth. MiB could easily use some of the alien spaceships to put the Arc-Net into earth orbit. Boris would be defeated then.

Goekhan
Upvote valid corrections to help move entries into the corrections section.

Suggested correction: Just because aliens have been landing on Earth regularly and MiB has contact with them, does not mean that 60's MiB have that sort of technology yet. They don't even seem to use their own space travel tech in the first two movies that take place way later.

Quantom X Premium member

Probably because the MIB want to keep Arc-Net secret until it is actually deployed in order to prevent a hostile alien from stealing it or sabotaging it.

I know some say MiB-Movies are not necessarily canonical. But there were 2 saucers parking at the New York State Pavilion "the bug" stole later in movie 1. Beside of that I guess MiB could've managed to smuggle the little Arc-Net into a another more discret rocket even years later, giving MiB enough time to protect the Arc-Net plus hunting both Borises down in the meanwhile. I know film-logic and so on, but a bit sloppy writing I guess in many ways.

Goekhan

13th Mar 2019

Superman II (1980)

Other mistake: The phantom zone villains were captured and put in space near Krypton. When Kal-El was sent to Earth, he has to pass 6 galaxies to arrive (his father said, before Krypton exploded). When Superman sends the hydrogen bomb in Paris into space, he didn't even leave the solar system. No way the phantom zone travelled through 6 galaxies - it has no propulsion, and the shock wave from the bomb wouldn't travel that far either.

Goekhan

Factual error: The self inflating boat on the "South China Air" plane is the typical modern colour yellow and modern shape, which didn't exist at that time.

Goekhan

27th Nov 2018

Titanic (1997)

Character mistake: At the beginning of the movie, Bill Paxton is pulling out documents out of the safe, maybe destroying some of them. Extremely unprofessional from an archaeological perspective. Although he represents a private company on a Russian ship searching for a diamond, he for sure violates many international laws with this brutal act of recovering objects. A professional treasure hunter should know that, plus a camera is filming him. He risks never getting a licence for a treasure hunt again.

Goekhan

25th Nov 2018

Wall Street (1987)

Factual error: Bud Fox is sitting in the limo with the hooker talking about Hewlett Packard stocks. Bud says: "HP...now, let's see. It closed at 41 1/4." HP stock price was nowhere near that price until the 90s.

Goekhan

Other mistake: Cpt. Yelland and civilian observer Lasky are trying hard not to mess up with the timeline. Changing little things in the past could have tremendous results in the present/future. However they already disrupted the natural timeline by shooting down 2 Japanese Zeros, killing both pilots, leaving behind CAG Owens in 1941 and rescueing secretary Laurel Scott who would've been killed for sure by the two previously shot down Mitsubishi Zeros.

Goekhan

20th Aug 2018

A Quiet Place (2018)

Question: The father seems to be a very scientific guy. But why hasn't he built some "sound-grenades" which they always carry around and throwing them away to distract the dangerous aliens when they are near? (for example loud toys, egg timers, etc.).

Goekhan

Answer: Possibly because it would be too dangerous. Most times an object like that could not be thrown far enough away to allow the family to escape, particularly in a panicked situation. A creature might be momentarily distracted, but would quickly zero in on them as very frightened children would probably be yelling, screaming, and crying.

raywest Premium member

19th Aug 2018

A Quiet Place (2018)

Plot hole: The aliens seems to be very strong, but not using technology at all. How come they defeated for example tank units? Doesn't look like they can penetrate steel with their arms.

Goekhan
Upvote valid corrections to help move entries into the corrections section.

Suggested correction: The aliens also demonstrate the ability to run extremely fast, easily able to outmaneuver a slow-moving tank. They would most likely jump on the top of the tank or rip the treads off, considering they still are extremely strong. They would also quickly jump onto a helicopter and take it down. As for other vehicles such as jets or aircraft carriers, the aliens either would have attacked military bases or taken the fight out to sea in ships. Whatever the answer, that particular element of the aliens is a large amount of possibilities, not a mistake.

If a waterfall can disorientate them, so would a jet engine or gunfire.

Something they teach in the military is the "ghost walk" - how to move silently. As the newspaper cuttings suggest, the noise angle was known about while there were still working printing presses, so it must have been a slow event. And a helicopter gunship can engage from up to 1km away, that's a long jump.

1st Aug 2018

Columbo (1971)

The Most Crucial Game - S2-E3

Plot hole: In the last scene Columbo convicts Hanlon of murder by playing back the recording of Hanlon's final call to the victim Wagner (the phone-box call near the crime scene is Hanlon's alibi. He is pretending to be in his VIP-box in the football stadium, which is too far away at the time he murders Wagner). The point is that the recording is missing the loud clock chimes from a little clock inside the VIP-box, which means Hanlon's alibi is "destroyed", he was not in his VIP-box, he must be somewhere else at that moment. Problem is the missing clock chimes are not hard evidence. Hanlon could say the clock was not working that day or the battery was empty and so on. Beside that it would be much easier to catch Hanlon if Columbo would check the outgoing phone calls asking the telephone company.

Goekhan
Upvote valid corrections to help move entries into the corrections section.

Suggested correction: He very likely will. As we've seen, Columbo is very thorough. The missing clock chimes aren't meant to be definitive proof, just enough to warrant an arrest. Columbo will continue to work the case and gather evidence.

Jason Hoffman

Columbo will continue to work the case and gather evidence? Well with that sentence they could stop every Columbo episode after 5 minutes. Hey guys, Columbo has nearly nothing against the murderer but he will continue to work the case outside this episode be sure.

23rd Jun 2018

Columbo (1971)

Any Old Port in a Storm - S3-E2

Plot hole: Carsini has a wine vault (with very expensive wine in it) with an integrated air conditioner. There are indeed wine vaults like that. But mostly active cooling wine vault are used by "amateur" wine lovers (who can't afford an underground cellar) but not by wine connoisseurs like Carsini. Active coolings are not very reliable. A power failure or a simple malfunction and Carsini would lose all of his expansive wines he collected for many years (like we saw in the episode). So why shouldn't a huge wine connoisseur build a cellar, surrounded by cooling soil where temperatures never rise that high? He is rich, he as a big estate, a villa, and he knows better to store the jewels of his passion adequately. Why store wines in a potential oven where high temperatures (without air conditioning) can even kill a man (his brother) in the first place? It is a far fetched and an unnecessary gambling just to have a murder-plot.

Goekhan

8th Jun 2018

The Terminator (1984)

Other mistake: Why does the Terminator have a HUD (Head-up-Display) or a GUI (Graphical User Interface)? This is a stupid mistake in many movies with cyborgs or androids. A machine itself does not need a HUD. A HUD is an interface for humans to help us interact with machines. A machine does not need a graphical interface to interact with itself. A machine can interpret the reality around internally using machine code within its CPU using zeros and ones. There is no need to project a HUD in the eyes of the terminator. (of course it looks cool and the viewer gets the information that the Terminator is a machine, but in reality it would be - let's say - a stupid redundancy to build in a monitor into a camera).

Goekhan
Upvote valid corrections to help move entries into the corrections section.

Suggested correction: The terminators are AI, since AI doesn't exist for real yet (not on that level) you don't know what it needs or how its supposed to function. Since these terminators are supposed to look and act like humans as they are infiltration units Skynet has build them to operate like humans as well. To help with thinking and acting like a human Skynet has build in a HUD in the optics so it will keep its focus on the visuals and not switch to internal sensors and computing when acting out it role as a human, that would look unnatural. With your logic its stupid for the terminator to put on sunglasses too, but it does anyway because it thinks like a human.

lionhead

Gotta disagree - the sunglasses are it trying to fit in/cover damage, not "think like a human." All "thinking" can be done internally. It's like saying modern smartphones need stats displayed on the inside of the screen which we can't see - there's zero need for them, because in order to display that information, the information has to exist in the machine already. And if it already exists, the machine already has access to it, without then displaying it on something else.

Jon Sandys Premium member

But it's not a smartphone. It's an AI, an AI built to be as human as possible. Whatever is operating its brain has external sensors and possibly an external computer telling it new data (like for example date, target location, primary objectives) which isn't directly part of its own brain. You can see that in the third movie when the Terminatrix gets confirmation about identifying its primary target, and it gets excited from it. The data it receives is coming from somewhere else and the terminator is reading from it, receiving it through an interface in the eyes. Probably in the future they have a direct link to Skynet telling them what to do and when they go to the past that link with Skynet is turned into a computer database with an interface for the terminator to communicate with.

lionhead

And how does this Skynet-upload to the terminators make the terminators more human if these information are displayed in a HUD? I am human too and never received any information into my eye as a projection (not without computers or Google glass or something like that). You are talking about simple data transfer, no need for a HUD and especially not to make the terminator more human (cause we humans do not have natural born HUDs in our eyes or brains). You are mixing up two things which really don't belong together. I was talking about recognition of environmental data in the first place and data processing of these. Still I don't see any need to HUD these information. We humans do not have HUD and are 100% humans. Your logic "HUD to become human" doesn't make any sense with or without a skynet data link.

Goekhan

It's not a simple little robot that uses sensors and act on them with a simple binary CPU, its an AI. It has optics, like I said it receives information and its displayed in the optics so it would not be distracted from acting human, turning inside itself to process it. You can give bad examples about us not having HUDs all you want but we get all outside information from our sense, 4 of them located in the head. We turn our attention to those senses when new information arrives. The Terminators get information input the same way, through the optics. They are build like a human. It can hear sound through its ears and smell from its nose. It sees with its optics, new information displayed upon them. What's so hard about that?

lionhead

Because we don't have HUDs to display all that info, and we work just fine as human. All the information is dumped directly into our brains. The Terminators would work likewise - there's literally no need to have a visual interface - it's a pointless middleman between the sensors and the processor which only exists because it looks good on film.

Jon Sandys Premium member

I see where youre going with this and I would theoretically agree if (and that's the big if) the HUD-Display would be an extra device which the Terminator puts on his head. I agree if the human-emulation-part would be mostly human and the HUD part would be a standalone extra. Problem is they put both into one machine. Which means the whole construction is not a human emulation device with the aim "developing by mimicry humans." If so then the terminator-race isn't doing well by puting non-human things into their human-emulation-machines.

Goekhan

It's just way the machine is put together. There could be many reasons for the machine to have a HUD, like power efficiency or even they were forced to do it this way since the CPU it needs was too large to fit in the skull. Instead of directly interfaced it reads external inputs through the HUD in its optics. Not because it wants to, but because it has to. Might not seem all that logical and efficient, but I'm saying there can be a reason for it. Even information concerning itself is done this way because it can't connect with itself directly. Programs, software tell it what is going on. If my computer would have optics and the ability to read its quite handy when it needs to read off other machines and programs, ones that are not necessarily connected to it. It would seem the terminator brain, the CPU, the AI, is separated from the robotic body. The only thing connecting it with the rest of the body is the optics, giving it information.

lionhead

Power efficiency? Putting information which came from "the eye" in the CPU and then back again into the CPU would cost double power and CPU size, cause you are doing anything two times. You are jumping now from "HUD for being human" to other translucent arguments. And your computer could have optics and read off other machines yes but it could do that without HUD. You only need a webcam and OCR. Reading data directly from inside other machines yes we call that bluetooth. However in none of these there is an extra machine outside the machine for the machine. It is always integrated into the machine and processing is internal.

Goekhan

Its all assumptions versus assumptions. I never said the HUD was there for the machine to "be more human", I said it was there because the terminator needs to keep its focus through the eyes to prevent it going internal whenever there is outside information. This all assuming the CPU in the brain isn't connected directly to the rest of the body, because of capacity and power issues. Again, all assumptions but what do you expect from sci-fi? Is it a mistake in the movie? Hardly.

lionhead

Suggested Idea: Firstly, I agree that if the terminator type CPU operates as a binary machine (such as a laptop or smartphone) all internal communication would be in 1's and 0's. Even our current computers, which may output hex code to dump files is for the benefit and 'readability' of humans. However, a theory: I believe the HUD on the Terminator may be some kind of 'diagnostic' feature which was built in to the original machines which were first developed by humans. I may be over thinking this (it is just a movie) however if you look at some remote operated drones and such, information is provided on a HUD for the benefit of human operators (in an areal drone, this may be altitude, heading, speed etc). My theory would be that perhaps this 'diagnostic' is an integral part of the CPU and Skynet did not want to 'risk' disrupting processes by restructuring the processor architecture (these must be built in very sophisticated factories, assumed to have remained from before the war due to the complexity of them). If I were a super efficient AI - personally I would see a huge advantage in removing it (think Windows - how much processing power and effort goes into 'pointless' graphics for the benefit of the user, such as the animations when you copy a file). Your modern computer has processor cycles to spare, but in the terminators I would guess these would be less so - hence the assumptions that it is less risk rather than just Skynet just 'never got around to it'.

This can be one of the reasons why the terminator has a HUD. One of the most plausible I'd say. Skynet build these terminators fast, not sophisticated, eventually they are all based off a human used robot as displayed in T3. All they did was improve its combat capabilities and human mimicking.

lionhead

20th Mar 2018

WarGames (1983)

Factual error: At the end of the movie WOPR tries to crack the launch-code using brute force. So far so good. When WOPR finds out one digit of the 10 digit code, the first digit locks and the search goes on with the remaining 9 digits. Then he finds the second one, it locks too and so on. Problem is, brute force doesn't work that way. It would be too easy (26 letters and 10 numbers = only 36 possibilities for one digit). Brute-Force works only "all or nothing", you can't sneak your way to the whole code one by one.

Goekhan

9th Feb 2018

Mine (2016)

Factual error: Scout Sniper Mike on a desert mission steps on a mine only to realise he has done so before stepping off it. The whole movie is about him standing in the desert with his left foot on the mine (waiting for rescue), and fighting against thirst, sand storms, wild dogs, the enemy and so on. The problem is, there is no mine (maybe never was) where someone has to step off it before it explodes. All mechanisms are configured to explode when someone steps on it.

Goekhan

Question: Why do Borg always attack earth with only one single ship? We already know from ST: Voyager that Borg have so many ships in the delta-quadrant that they sometimes attack with 10 or more ships at the same time. Why don't they just send 2 or 3 of their cubes next time? Borg knows that the Federation needed their very last resources and a lot of luck to defeat the Borg Cube last time (Battle of Wolf359). So 2 ships at least should do the job this time. Instead they again send one cube and risk defeat.

Goekhan

Answer: The Borg think like machines. They have calculated that 1 cube is enough to conquer Earth so they send 1 cube. Both times they got defeated because of incalculable events. Both times they didn't have a reason to send more than 1 cube.

lionhead

This is wrong. Borg do have a big reason to send more than 1 cube the second time. They know, that Locutus (Picard) is there somewhere and can log-in into the borg hive when Borg are near him. He received visions from the borg shortly before battle and calculated with this information "unimportant" weak-spots which destroyed the second Borg cube. If someone knows your weak spots and you this someone is near nearby then Borgs should be more precoutious than last time.

Goekhan

The Enterprise was not at the battle, the Borg knew that, Picard went in against orders and intervened. This time the Borg took more than just a cube anyway, they took time travel with them. They probably had it as a contingency plan.

lionhead

The contingency plan is even more brainless, explaining one plot hole with another one. There is absolutely no need to fly into the earths atmosphere to start their time machine. They could've done it even more safely before entering federation territory.

Goekhan

That doesn't make any sense. They didn't have to enter the atmosphere, I don't even think they did. The sphere escaped the exploding cube and almost immediately opened a vortex. Also, saying that they "could have done it even more safely before entering federation space" is nonsense since they needed to be in federation space for the contingency plan anyway. Nothing safer about it doing it outside of federation space, just takes more time.

lionhead

Answer: The Borg don't care that much about Earth, or losing a single cube. They are mostly testing the water before fully expanding towards the Alpha Quadrant. Their space is in the Delta Quadrant and still a long way from expanding into the Alpha Quadrant.

Not entirely true because the Borg queen was on board the cube, and they had a contingency plan to go back in time, making their efforts quite elaborate. They have attacked Earth twice now, because they know about it from the Enterprise (and Q) and plan on conquering it and expand into the Alpha Quadrant. A cube is equivalent to an entire fleet of ships and Picard accurately calls this action by the Borg an invasion (the second one).

lionhead

11th Dec 2017

The Prestige (2006)

Factual error: When Angier and Cutter are looking for a new workshop they enter a room, with a fully glassed wall on one side. A very modern white radiator is in the room. (00:35:00)

Goekhan

Factual error: In the first minutes of the movie, Bond is in an Albatross L-39 ZA, ejecting his enemy (in the back seat, who wants to strangulate him), not himself (in the front seat). Bond unlocks the ejection system with the switch on the console, but in reality ejection in that aircraft is triggered by a double firing handle on the seat pan.

Goekhan

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