MikeH

25th Oct 2021

Hacksaw Ridge (2016)

Question: What was the point of court martialling Doss? They said he couldn't go to war if he didn't use a gun, and they gave him the option to quit. So why wouldn't they just kick him out?

MikeH

Answer: Doss faced a court-martial because he refused the direct order of handling a rifle from camp commander Colonel Sangston. If the Army simply kicked him out, it could inspire other men to follow in his footsteps and refuse to carry a rifle. While Doss could not live with that shame, it can be assumed many others would not have that same problem.

Invader_Gir

20th Sep 2019

Hacksaw Ridge (2016)

Stupidity: When Doss buried the wounded soldier, leaving one eye out made no sense. It did nothing to help him. All it did was make it easier for the Japanese to spot him. It would've made sense to leave his nose and/or mouth out, so he could breathe. He did not need to see.

MikeH

Upvote valid corrections to help move entries into the corrections section.

Suggested correction: A person who is unable to see is more likely to panic. When Doss buried the wounded Marine, he asked him to take a deep breath and trust him. By leaving one eye open, it allowed him to see the gravity of the situation as IJA soldiers walked by and maintain eye contact with Doss who hid under a dead Marine. After the suspicious IJA soldier bayoneted the body over Doss, he looked directly at where the wounded man was buried and kept walking. It was a crude method, but it likely saved them both.

Invader_Gir

24th Jul 2017

Hacksaw Ridge (2016)

Continuity mistake: When the Japanese man at the end stabs himself in the stomach, in one shot we can see there's no knife in his stomach.

MikeH

19th Feb 2017

Hacksaw Ridge (2016)

Question: Why did the Japanese man at the end kill himself?

MikeH

Chosen answer: Japan's culture is complex and has a long history of ritual suicide ingrained within it. For Japanese, this practice was often expected of someone who had somehow failed, shamed, or otherwise dishonored themselves, their family, their country, and so on. Historically, suicide was also committed by servants after their master died, by Samurai widows, or when people were defeated by their enemies. At the end of WWII, many Japanese soldiers and civilians committed suicide rather than surrender.

raywest Premium member

Join the mailing list

Separate from membership, this is to get updates about mistakes in recent releases. Addresses are not passed on to any third party, and are used solely for direct communication from this site. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Check out the mistake & trivia books, on Kindle and in paperback.