MikeH

29th May 2020

Munich (2005)

Continuity mistake: When a man is shot, and falls onto the bed, in one shot there's no blood on the bed, but in the very next shot there is.

MikeH

29th May 2020

Scarface (1983)

Continuity mistake: When Shadow is shot, in one shot he's touching his face, but in the very next shot he's touching the detonator on his lap.

MikeH

29th May 2020

Breaking Bad (2008)

Show generally

Question: Can someone please explain the swearing rules? I'm not American, so I don't know which channels have to follow the FCC rules. But I heard AMC said they could only use one F word per season. Why would they make that rule? If they have to follow the FCC rules, they can't say it at all. If they don't, they can say it as much as they want. And aside from Season 2, they all had more than one. How did they get away with it?

MikeH

Answer: The FCC actually only regulates local broadcast channels. Cable channels - even basic ones - are free to depict as much violence, profanity, and sexual content (as long as it's not pornographic) as they want. However, they choose to scale back on that so as not to offend viewers and potentially drive away sponsors.

Phaneron Premium member

27th May 2020

Twilight (2008)

Answer: The same as anyone else. The Cullens live like normal humans. They have fake birth certificates, social security numbers, passports, and all other necessary I.D. All of the younger Cullens attend high school (again and again) like any other teenager. Carlisle Cullen is a doctor, and therefore would have fake medical credentials. Carlisle is immensely wealthy, having accumulated a fortune over the centuries. He has the means to provide whatever they need to maintain their human identities. That would allow Edward, and any of the others, to apply for a driver's license.

raywest Premium member

15th May 2020

Black Panther (2018)

Continuity mistake: When Killmonger cuts a woman's throat, in one shot a spear is not red, but in the very next shot it is.

MikeH

15th May 2020

Pay it Forward (2000)

Revealing mistake: When Trevor is stabbed, we can see the knife isn't in him, it's just pressed against his shirt.

MikeH

15th May 2020

Charlie Bartlett (2007)

Question: What exactly is wrong with cameras? It's a public area. They have no privacy either way.

MikeH

Answer: It is debatable if there is anything wrong with using cameras, but I can think of some possible answers to "what exactly is wrong with using cameras" at a school yard. Cameras symbolize authority over and oppression of students by the principal (and other authority figures). Cameras are indicative of a lack of trust of ALL students, but usually there is only a small percentage of trouble-makers. The use of cameras unjustly undermines the maturity of most students and makes the students resent the school authority figures. Cameras make the assumption that all the students are engaging (or might engage) in unacceptable behavior, which is offensive to the majority of students who follow the rules. Cameras are contrary to our value of "freedom" and that Uncle Sam does not have a right to constantly monitor citizens. People should not be videotaped in a free society if they have done nothing wrong. Many people simply do not like being videotaped. Cameras can record embarrassing acts.

Answer: Perhaps because many public cameras are recording peoples' actions.

raywest Premium member

Meaning the recorded camera footage can act as a permanent film record of peoples' actions that can't be disputed easily.

raywest Premium member

Question: Did the guy in the car crash die? It looked like he did, but why wasn't it mentioned again?

MikeH

Question: Did the language get easier as the film went on, or did I just get used to it?

MikeH

Answer: Getting used to it is certainly a factor, but it also helps that Kubrick cut down on the Nadsat considerably when adapting the novel. What he does leave in is usually easy to understand from context (e.g, "trying to make up our rassoodocks" or "viddy well"). The Nadsat in Alex's narration in the novel is much denser and sometimes not so easy to interpret at first glance, to the point where early American editions had a glossary in the back.

15th May 2020

The Rookie (2018)

Answer: This hardly seem to be an automatic center punch. Standard tool for technical rescue from car accidents.

Answer: Yes. The Auschwitz concentration and extermination camp site was a huge area consisting of 3 separate camps, of which Camp II (Birkenau) was the biggest and had the commandant office and SS housing right next to it. The camp commander lived either close to camp II in the small town of Brzezinka or camp I, called the main camp. There were several houses and farms around the area and the town of Oswiecim in between all three camps. There were also several dozen subcamps.

lionhead

15th May 2020

Muriel's Wedding (1994)

Answer: Yes, she stole the dress.

raywest Premium member

6th May 2020

Focus (2015)

Question: Would it really be possible to trick someone's brain, the way they did with the number 55?

MikeH

Answer: Absolutely. There are many people (especially people who work on high commissions and con men) who are well practiced in subtle cues with body language. The elaborate process they went through in the movie greatly increased the chances he would make such a pick, but there was no guarantee. However, it was constructed with personal knowledge of the target. Even more strange was the fact that a string of some of his reasonable bets went bad (the missed extra point, the pick of the card, etc). Had they all not gone bad, it would have disrupted his faked desperation to the multi-million dollar bet.

6th May 2020

The Green Mile (1999)

Question: What did Paul mean when he said "we know people too"?

MikeH

Answer: He's saying that while Percy may have high government connections to be able to get them fired, he and the other guards have lower connections that could hurt Percy physically and make his cowardice in the face of Wild Bill public, humiliating him and also likely costing him his job.

LorgSkyegon

6th May 2020

House, M.D. (2004)

Answer: Perhaps just to screw with Foreman some more, perhaps to give him hope that he might be able to come back someday after Wilson is dead.

LorgSkyegon

6th May 2020

Breaking Bad (2008)

Answer: In an episode of Better Call Saul, we see Gus prevent someone from murdering Hector, and even pay for some of his treatment after Hector has a stroke. He wants Hector to remain alive in the state that we see him: bound to a wheelchair, unable to speak, unable to take care of himself. It's Gus' way of making Hector suffer. He felt a quick death would be letting Hector off too easy.

jshy7979

Answer: Gus considered killing Hector as being "too good for him." He wanted Hector to suffer in the same way he had suffered. Hector killed Gus' partner, so Gus worked to destroy Hector's family before gloating and killing him. Gus even prevented Mike from killing Hector for this very reason.

Answer: Because for as long as Hector was alive Gus could gloat over his enemy.

Ssiscool Premium member

28th Apr 2020

Breaking Bad (2008)

Answer: Part of reason for the firing was because George considered Gus a personal friend and ignored Hank's suspicions of Gus' involvement in the meth business. Even after questioning Gus, he still ignored Hank when Hank try's to tell him Gus is lying.

Bishop73

Answer: The DEA needed a scapegoat to throw under the bus as Gus made them look bad being right under their nose and George was the agent in charge so took the fall. And yes, had Hank not been killed he too would most likely have been fired.

The_Iceman

28th Apr 2020

She's All That (1999)

Question: Why would the bullies even do what Zack tells them to do? They could easily beat him.

MikeH

Answer: They might be able to beat him in a fight, but Zack is by far the most popular boy on campus. Fighting him would make them social outcasts. In addition, it is a movie cliche to show bullies exposed as cowards when they are directly confronted by someone with confidence.

BaconIsMyBFF

Question: Why would Brad go to jail for refusing to rat Donnie out? Doesn't he have the right to remain silent?

MikeH

Answer: If you are referring to a person's Miranda Rights, it does not give someone the right to remain silent indefinitely or to conceal a crime. It is a notification police give to criminal suspects who are in custody, advising them of their right to refuse to answer questions or provide information to law enforcement or other officials during an interrogation. A person can also invoke their Fifth Amendment right while on trial, but that also does not protect them from being convicted of a crime.

raywest Premium member

Question: Is this the last movie in the Infinity Saga? I always thought Endgame was, but apparently I was wrong. Wouldn't it make more sense for Endgame to be?

MikeH

Answer: All MCU movies from Phase 1 through Phase 3 are considered to be in the Infinity Saga. Avengers: Endgame is considered to be the climax, while this film is considered to be the epilogue.

Phaneron Premium member

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