Jean G

The Maze Affair - S4-E13

Continuity mistake: Solo and Illya park their big Chrysler convertible in front of Del Floria's and go inside. The shot then cuts to the tailor shop's interior with a view of the street through the window, and the car they just parked out front is nowhere to be seen. (00:00:20)

Jean G

18th Jan 2010

Star Trek (1966)

That Which Survives - S3-E17

Trivia: Actress Lee Meriwether says she was teased daily by a playful DeForest Kelley while shooting "That Which Survives." He continually pulled down the glued-on cloth rectangle that NBC insisted should conceal her navel, then squinted at her tummy and asked, "What time is it?" On the final day of filming, she got back at him. When Kelley peeled off the cloth, he broke up laughing before he could ask the question. Meriwether had glued a small, ticking clock over her navel - set to the correct time, of course.

Jean G

18th Jan 2010

Star Trek (1966)

That Which Survives - S3-E17

Trivia: In the 1960s, showing the female navel was forbidden by NBC's censors. This was why Losira's costume had that weird square patch sticking up from the otherwise low-cut hip-hugger pants. (Oddly, no such restriction applied to male costumes.) By 1969, the network had abandoned the rule, and "The Cloud Minders" became the only Trek episode with costumes shamelessly exposing women's navels.

Jean G

18th Jan 2010

Star Trek (1966)

Day of the Dove - S3-E7

Trivia: Scotty's line to Spock is, "Keep your Vulcan hands off me!" But the word "Vulcan" is indistinct and unfortunately, sounds rather like a certain obscenity starting with the letter F. This resulted in several TV stations across the US censoring that part of Scott's misunderstood line with a "Bleep." (00:25:00)

Jean G

15th Jan 2010

Star Trek (1966)

The Enterprise Incident - S3-E2

Trivia: The third season's tight budget forced the recycling of many props. Here, the Romulan cloaking device was rather obviously cobbled together from two items used in previous episodes: Nomad's head from "The Changeling," and Sargon's globe from "Return to Tomorrow."

Jean G

15th Jan 2010

Star Trek (1966)

Spock's Brain - S3-E1

Trivia: In any poll, "Spock's Brain" unfailingly wins the title of Absolute Worst Star Trek Episode - Ever. Gene L. Coon wrote it under his pen name, Lee Cronin, but never intended to actually produce it. His terrible script was a practical joke, a jab at Gene Roddenberry after they'd argued over where the series should go. But by season 3, both Coon and Roddenberry had left the show, and their clueless replacements filmed the thing, thinking this shark-jumping episode was great stuff.

Jean G

15th Jan 2010

Star Trek (1966)

Assignment: Earth - S2-E26

Continuity mistake: Isis is an all-black cat, but in a few shots, her "stunt double" with white paws can be spotted. The cat lying on the floor of the transporter room when Gary Seven beams aboard is a white-pawed double.

Jean G

13th Jan 2010

Star Trek (1966)

A Private Little War - S2-E19

Trivia: Director Marc Daniels employed an old trick to save Nona's topless bathing scene from NBC's censors. He deliberately shot twice the needed footage, including risque side shots exposing portions of bare breast. After the censors excised the "most naked" portions, what remained was precisely what Daniels had wanted to begin with: a bare-backed Nona bathing in the waterfall.

Jean G

13th Jan 2010

Star Trek (1966)

The Trouble With Tribbles - S2-E15

Trivia: Prop master Jim Rugg "animated" the tribbles by inserting wind-up toys under their fur to make them crawl, and by supplying some with small balloons and concealed air hoses, making them appear to breathe.

Jean G

13th Jan 2010

Star Trek (1966)

Return to Tomorrow - S2-E20

Trivia: The title "Return to Tomorrow" didn't translate well into other languages. So in France, the episode became "You Are Nothing But Dust"; in Japan, "Energy at 160 Kilometers Underground," and in Germany, "Ghost Craves Body!"

Jean G

11th Jan 2010

Star Trek (1966)

Friday's Child - S2-E11

Continuity mistake: The Klingon is standing on a hillside above Maab, yet when he fires his phaser, the beam streaks upward. From that angle, he wouldn't have hit anything but sky. Nevertheless, the beam somehow re-angles itself downward so that it hits and kills Maab. (00:46:05)

Jean G

5th Jan 2010

Fahrenheit 451 (1966)

Continuity mistake: When he's called in to see the Captain, Montag wears his wristwatch turned inward (with the face resting over his pulse point). Seconds later, though he hasn't touched it, the watch has rotated itself 180 degrees and is now on top of his wrist. (00:26:05)

Jean G

5th Jan 2010

Fahrenheit 451 (1966)

Trivia: Fahrenheit 451 is director Francois Truffaut's only film in English.

Jean G

5th Jan 2010

Fahrenheit 451 (1966)

Deliberate mistake: Montag's hair gets intermittently shorter, longer and shorter again (and acquires a "cow lick" that wasn't there before) near the end of the film. (Oskar Werner had clashed with Francois Truffaut and deliberately had his hair cut to spite director.)

Jean G

4th Jan 2010

Fahrenheit 451 (1966)

Trivia: The books seen burning at various points in the film include several of Ray Bradbury's novels (Fahrenheit 451 itself is one of these), as well as a French cinema magazine for which director Francois Truffaut once wrote a movie column.

Jean G

3rd Jan 2010

Star Trek (1966)

Season 2 generally

Trivia: Paramount's press releases in 1967 claimed that the Soviet news agency Pravda had complained about Star Trek having no Russian characters, so they were adding Chekov. This story was completely bogus. (Star Trek never aired in the U.S.S.R.) NBC wanted to appeal to the 8-14 teenybopper crowd, and asked Roddenberry to add a character who looked like Davy Jones of the Monkees. So Chekov debuted in season 2, replete with a bad Beatle wig that was, thankfully, soon jettisoned.

Jean G

3rd Jan 2010

Star Trek (1966)

Mirror, Mirror - S2-E4

Trivia: Because Barbara Luna came down with strep, all of Marlena's kissing scenes with Kirk had to be put on hold. They were shot a month later when she'd recovered. "And you can tell," Luna says. "In the kissing scenes, I'm several pounds thinner."

Jean G

3rd Jan 2010

Star Trek (1966)

Shore Leave - S1-E16

Trivia: "Shore Leave" was the first of many Star Trek episodes (and movies) partially shot at Vasquez Rocks, a distinctive California desert rock formation named for a 19th Century bandit who once had a hideout there. Kirk and Finnegan's fistfight and Kirk's encounter with Ruth were both shot at Vasquez. The formation is most prominently featured in "Arena," when Kirk pushes the boulder off its peak onto the Gorn.

Jean G

2nd Jan 2010

Star Trek (1966)

The Menagerie (1) - S1-E12

Trivia: Gene Roddenberry wanted "alien plants" for the planet's surface, but had trouble communicating the idea to the prop department. They sent dozens of lush, green potted specimens, all very terrestrial. A frustrated Roddenberry finally grabbed one potted tree, yanked it out of the soil and stuck it back in upside down with its bare, tangled roots exposed. "There," he grumped. "Now that's an alien plant!"

Jean G

2nd Jan 2010

Star Trek (1966)

The Menagerie (1) - S1-E12

Trivia: For her Orion slave girl dance, Susan Oliver was painted green from head to toe. But every time production footage of her came back from the processing lab, no trace of her green make-up job showed on film. After three rounds of Gene Roddenberry ordering the make-up crew to "paint her greener!" it was finally deduced that the lab techs, assuming her color was a lighting error, had been re-tinting her a nice, healthy pink every time.

Jean G

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