sfbiker1

Factual error: Mr. Dawes Jr. states that the tuppence (two pence) invested by Michael grew into enough to pay off the mortgage on the house. Interest rates over that 20 year time period were about 4%, which would have made that 2p grow to all of 4p. Go nuts and assume an impossibly high return of 15% per annum, compound, consistent over the twenty years. Despite the fact that not even Bernie Madoff offered ridiculously high returns like that, after twenty years the original two pence investment would be worth 39p. As an aside, houses of the time cost about £750, far below current London prices, but still considerably more than 39p.

wizard_of_gore Premium member
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Suggested correction: In the movie, Mr Dawes said "We did just that, and thanks to several quite clever investments...that tuppence has grown into quite a sum" - so the investment didn't grow by interest alone. Growing a £0.02 investment to £750 is unlikely, but not impossible, especially if the friendly bank president fudged a little and pulled it off losing investments and only counted winning investments. And of course, Dawes could have been telling a white lie to make up for the way Wilkins treated the Banks family and planned to pay off the loan with his own funds.

sfbiker1

Absolutely. The 2 pence was an investment, not a deposit. It is perfectly in keeping with the whimsical magic theme of the movie that the investment should have grown exponentially. Real world investments have done better. A 5 cent Bitcoin investment (about 2 pence!) grew to about $15,000 in less time! This entry is not a "Factual Error."

11th Mar 2013

August Rush (2007)

Plot hole: When Mr. Jeffries finds out that Evan is named August Rush too, he goes to the Central Park concert and sees Evan onstage, however he couldn't know that Evan was having a concert, or even that Evan was at that place at that time.

Upvote valid corrections to help move entries into the corrections section.

Suggested correction: There were streetlight banners all over Central Park with August Rush's name on them (and presumably the Philharmonic had flyers and other ads with August's name on them). So it's certainly conceivable that Jeffries recognized the name from an advertisement.

sfbiker1

13th Jul 2017

Passengers (2016)

Corrected entry: Jim somehow plants a small live tree of about 15 feet in height on the ship's Grand Concourse, meaning that he must have constructed a large container of soil (with irrigation) beneath the bulkhead to accommodate the tree's rootball. This is perhaps feasible, given that Jim is a mechanical engineer, and we see his schematic of the root container drawn on the concourse deck. However, at the end of the film, some 88 years after Jim planted the small tree, the ship's actual crew emerges from hibernation to find a tree of truly gigantic proportions growing on the concourse deck. The tree has easily grown to 70 or more feet in height, which would require an approximately equal amount of space below the bulkhead to accommodate its massive root system. Even if Jim somehow continued expanding the root container to the size of a 7-story building below deck, it's unlikely that he could fill it with millions of pounds of garden soil.

Correction: The ship had farming equipment and supplies in the cargo hold for use in colonizing an alien planet, which would have given him the supplies he needed. I think it's safe to say that a technologically advanced society that can put humans into suspended animation for a hundred years and build an interstellar starship could also have the technology to sustain a tree without requiring hundreds of tons of soil from Earth - perhaps some sort of hydroponic system.

sfbiker1

13th Jul 2017

Passengers (2016)

Corrected entry: At the end, Jim tells Aurora that the medical diagnostic and treatment unit "AutoDoc" can place her back into a state of hibernation so that she can complete the journey to Homestead II. She immediately objects, saying, "But there's only one AutoDoc!" (i.e., saying she won't do it if it means leaving Jim behind). Really? Only one AutoDoc unit on a half-mile-long starship with over 5,000 passengers and crewmen? Stupidity.

Charles Austin Miller

Correction: The auto-doc is a tool for human doctors, it was not meant to be the primary form of medical treatment. This is evident when the auto-doc refused to reveal a prognosis because there was no doctor present, and in another case, it refused to administer treatment without medical supervision, and someone had to choose the specific treatment (s) to apply. Plus, it's likely an extremely expensive piece of equipment and the for-profit company that built the ship didn't see a need to put more than one on the ship.

sfbiker1

4th Apr 2017

Passengers (2016)

Corrected entry: When the ship temporarily loses all gravity, Aurora, who is swimming, is lifted out of the pool along with the water. Jim is sleeping in his cabin, and he and other objects float into the air. Gus, who is also sleeping in his bed, only has his arms lifted up. His body and the blanket stay completely stationary. He is not strapped into the bed, nor is the blanket tightly wrapped to the bed. When gravity is restored, his arms flop back down.

raywest Premium member

Correction: In that scene, the blanket doesn't appear to move at all, while (as you said) his arms float into the air, which suggests that the blanket itself is held down magnetically (or through some other mechanism). His bed may have this extra feature because he's a crew member.

sfbiker1

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