rbryant73

26th Apr 2003

The Untouchables (1987)

Corrected entry: When Ness chases Nitti onto the roof of the courthouse, Nitti turns to fire back at him. He fires his .45 empty - we can see that the slide is back and the barrel is protruding - then runs a bit more, then turns to fire again. Anyone who knows anything about guns - like, say, a professional killer - would know when an automatic is empty.

rbryant73

Correction: He's a professional killer, yes, but that doesn't mean he wouldn't try to fire without checking the gun to see if the slide was back. Military personnel who handle firearms for a living have been known to do similar things in real life.

28th Apr 2003

Boyz n the Hood (1991)

Corrected entry: In the end, Monster guns down the punks who killed Ricky. Doughboy approaches Ferris to finish him off. He fires a few shots from his .45 (I think it's three; at any rate it's less than the weapon's full capacity of seven), at which point the gun is empty (the slide stays back). Why wouldn't he keep his gun fully loaded?

rbryant73

Correction: I don't see how not keeping the gun fully loaded is a mistake. Take your pick as to why he didn't keep it fully loaded, but it doesn't make a mistake.

Lummie Premium member

1st May 2003

Robocop (1987)

Corrected entry: After Murphy dies, the screen goes black and there is a very cool sequence of scenes from RoboCop's point of view. In one of them, though, a female Security Concepts/OCP suit says, "Bring in the LED" and a green light-grid covers the screen. A technician then "secures" each corner with a screwdriver, but as he does each screw, the grid gets progressively closer to the screen, until it has disappeared. What kind of device would move each time a corner is tightened?

rbryant73

Correction: Unknown, but this one does. It is a technology of the future; we just need to accept that it works the way it is portrayed in the film. A curiosity, but not a movie mistake.

BocaDavie Premium member

26th Apr 2003

Blade Runner (1982)

Corrected entry: According to the timeline of the film, Batty and his replicant associates escape from off-world, then come to Earth. After they try to break into Tyrell Corp. and fail, the police decide to VK new employees at Tyrell to see if the replicants are trying to infiltrate that way (which they are, via Leon). This doesn't make any sense - the Tyrell corporation MADE Leon. The second he walked in the door to apply for a job, he'd be recognised. Even if he wasn't, once the Tyrell Corp. knows it has a problem, they could just compare photos of all the new employees to their file footage of Leon (which Bryant shows to Deckard in the beginning). (00:14:10)

rbryant73

Correction: He wouldn't necessarily be recognised at once: it is exceedingly unlikely that the entire corporation knows the faces of every replicant they ever made. As for checking photographs, in the novelisation it is actually mentioned that it is possible to change their faces, so they would have had to VK everyone anyway.

30th Apr 2003

The Terminator (1984)

Corrected entry: After Traxler is shot by the Terminator, Vukovich finds him wounded, says "Ed," then jumps into the hallway and opens up on the Terminator, calling out "Hey." Lance Henriksen is just shaking the weapon in his hands; there is no muzzle flash and no spent shells eject. (00:59:55)

rbryant73

Correction: In fact, the gun Lance Henrikson fires does have a muzzle flash, and does eject spent cartridges. The lighting and angle of the shot just makes it difficult to see.

Corrected entry: At the end, when Topper is swordfighting with Saddam on a balcony, he jumps onto the railing and leaps to the floor below. When he hits the floor, he's momentarily concealed by a table in the foreground, then stands up. This is because a stunt double jumps from the balcony, and then Charlie Sheen stands up from behind the table--but after Charlie stands up, you can see the stuntman's foot rise into view as he settles on the pad he landed on.

rbryant73

Correction: This is a spoof on the stunt double techniques used in action movies and meant to be seen. Charlie Sheen pops out so far away from the landing that a child would know it was fake. Also, the stuntman is, as you rightly point out, in the scene at the same time as Charlie for a few frames, to accentuate the farce.

26th Apr 2003

Jacob's Ladder (1990)

Corrected entry: After Jacob's harrowing experience in the subway at the beginning, we get an establishing shot of the New York skyline which includes the World Trade Center. The Trade Center was not completed until 1973--the same year the Vietnam War ended. Jacob would have been stabbed and died before it was there.

rbryant73

Correction: The scene is supposed to be based years after Jacobs serving in Vietnam, thereby making the World Trade Center complete.

Correction: The story of the "The Bridge on the River Kwai" is not the story of building a single bridge. It is the story of WWII allied POWs forced under horrific conditions to build the Thai-Burma railroad for the Japanese Army. The railroad constructed was 415 Kilometers long and included 688 bridges, 680 of which where made of wood. For most of the railroads length it somewhat followed the route of the River Kwai and actually crossed it several times. When the railroad was completed, many of the bridges along its length where bombed and destroyed by allied air raids and had to be rebuilt. As such the wooden bridge in the movie is a composite representation of all the bridges.

27th Apr 2003

The Hunted (2003)

Corrected entry: Most of the US posters and billboards for "The Hunted" feature the tagline "Some men must be found." Kind of weak and a bit vague, right? Well, earlier posters feature the tagline "Some men should not be found." Those advertising people were all over the place. "Is he so dangerous that maybe he shouldn't be found?" "I don't know, I would think you'd WANT to find somebody like that."

rbryant73

Correction: All well and good, but not really trivia.

28th Apr 2003

Die Hard (1988)

Corrected entry: It's been pointed out that McClane's shirt changes from white to green after he emerges from the vents; this is certainly a "cheat" by the wardrobe department to make him appear grimy and battle-worn. But notice, also, that toward the end of the film, the shirt switches back to white.

rbryant73

Correction: Towards the end of the film he's not wearing a shirt at all.

tw_stuart

28th Apr 2003

Thelma and Louise (1991)

Corrected entry: When Harvey Keitel shows up to talk to Thelma's husband, it is raining, but only on the foreground stretch of road. If you watch the cars, you can see them pass from a sunny area into the part of the road under the rain machines.

rbryant73

Correction: It is raining in the sunny area as well - you can see the water splashing off of the cars' roofs. Sunshine and rain at the same time is not unusual - it is just a shower.

jle

Corrected entry: When John asks Terminator whether "Hasta la vista, baby" rings a bell, Terminator tells him that was a different "T-101." This nomenclature is incorrect: Terminator is a Cyberdyne Systems Series 800 Model 101, also referred to as a T-800 (in this film he's a T-850). "T-101" is a bastardized combination of model and series numbers, and is inconsistent with what appears in both other films. 800 and 101 are both numbers that refer to the "Arnold" terminator (model and series, respectively). But the "T" prefix is supposed to be followed by the model number (800), not the series (101). It's like referring to a Ford F-150 STX as an "F-STX." Even if what is meant can be inferred, it is a technical error, the kind the terminator would never make (especially in referring to itself).

rbryant73

Correction: While that may prove true for the previous Terminator movies, it doesn't ring true for Terminator 3. Cyberdyne was destroyed in Terminator 2, along with all research and development based on the Terminator chip. In Terminator 3, it is very and carefully explained that Cyberdyne is NOT responsible for the creation of SkyNet, hence it would have absolutely nothing to do with the creation of Terminators. Since the T-850 came from a future where Cyberdyne is not responsible for the creation of SkyNet, then the "CSM-101" nomenclature for the Terminators in the previous movies is completely irrelevant and incorrect. As far as this Terminator is concerned, there never was any 'CSM-101' model, but there IS T-101. T-101 refers to the Skin, but T-850 refers to the endoskeleton machine. SkyNet did not use any Cyberdyne technology to build its Terminators, instead using whatever technology it could find (likely the machines from the Military Base). Hence, this is definitely not a mistake at all; in this current future there is no Cyberdyne, hence no CSM-101's, since CSM-101 stands for Cyberdyne Systems Model .

furious1116

Corrected entry: When R2-D2 and C3-PO arrive at Jabba's palace, C3-PO comments to R2 that "...poor Chewbacca never made it out of this place." But Boushk shows up with the "captured" Chewie later in the film.

rbryant73

Correction: This was part of the story that they made up and told C-3P0. They did not tell 3P0 what they were going to do, because they were afraid he would say something by accident, so they made up a story to tell him.

Bruce Minnick

28th Apr 2003

Broken Arrow (1996)

Corrected entry: When Slater steals the Humvee with the nuke in it, Howie Long starts shooting at him. He is chastised by Travolta, something like: "Would you please not shoot at the NUCLEAR weapon"? However, we were informed earlier, after the Stealth bomber crashes, not to worry since these weapons can sit in "burning jet fuel for five hours" and be fine. Well, which is it? Are they stable or not?

rbryant73

Correction: Are you telling me that even though you know the bombs are stable, you wouldn't be the slightest bit worried that it might go off for no reason? I know I would be paranoid.

28th Apr 2003

Starship Troopers (1997)

Corrected entry: Someone else pointed out that it seems unlikely an interstellar military force would use infantry troops with projectile weapons to fight the bugs. Well, I have perhaps a larger problem with the "reality" of the film. When it becomes clear that the bugs are a threat to humanity, the Mobile Infantry is sent in to fight them. These forces are promptly slaughtered. In a later scene we see some kind of aircraft flying over the surface of the planet, dropping bombs, and THEN the Mobile Infantry goes into the bombed area. Um, haven't we been using airpower to bombard an area, THEN sending in infantry to claim it, since World War II? Isn't that like basic war-making?

rbryant73

Correction: You can only drop some bombs from aircrafts if you aren't kept busy with artillery-fire. The first time the MI engaged they didn't have this option, because of the heavy fire coming from the planets surface. It was already hard enough to land some boats. Also, the military wasn't really aware of the trouble they're getting in. The humans thought they will fight some mindless enemy with no strategic capability. After being proven wrong they changed their approach very quickly.

26th Apr 2003

Star Wars (1977)

Corrected entry: This happens a few times - when the TIE fighters are pursuing the X-Wings in the Death Star trench, there are insert shots of a computerized targeting system. We see a computer model of an X-Wing moving around on the screen, then rapidly flashing as it centers and is presumably locked on to. Then the pilot fires, and we cut to a shot out through the cockpit window. We see lasers fire widely to the side of the X-Wing, then continue to fire as they slowly track toward and eventually hit the ship - almost like using tracers to "walk" your fire onto a target. So what does the targeting system do exactly?

rbryant73

Correction: Of course, X-wings do not stay still to be shot at, so it might be assumed that when the computer locked onto the fighter, it could then take over the firing mechanism or steering device and then automatically finish the process of chasing down and killing the fighter without the pilot's assistance. All the pilot needed to do was get close enough.

Sol Parker

Corrected entry: TX may be able to gain control of computerized devices, but driving a car remotely is ridiculous. How does she shift it from park into drive? How does she steer? Driving a car is a mechanical process. If the car itself was already equipped with a computerized remote device, and she gained control of THAT, she could do it, but that's not the case. Remote control of a normal car goes beyond "controlling machines" - it's more like telekinesis.

rbryant73

Correction: Driving a car maybe a mechanical process, but it still not impossible for the T-X to remotely control them. The T-850 says she use "nano-technology" to control machines, but he does not explain in detail. This leaves the possibility that she uses small nanobots to take over the mechanical devices within the car in order to steer, shift gears, etc. She may not be controlling the car directly but she could control the nanobots which do. Come on, use your imagination.

26th Apr 2003

Aliens (1986)

Corrected entry: When the Marines are underneath the "primary heat exchangers," Dietrich is grabbed from behind by an alien, and her flamethrower discharges, igniting Frost. He flies over a railing and down a shaft. If you watch the sequence, you will see that when Frost hears Dietrich scream, he turns to face her, raising his pistol. At this point, he is facing away from the shaft. Flames fill the frame as he is engulfed. In the very next shot, he is on fire, and is charging full speed toward the shaft. There wasn't enough time for him to turn around 180 degrees.

rbryant73

Correction: Watch closely. Frost turns around with his pistol, but as he sees the flames coming at him he begins turning away again, towards the shaft. The flames then hit him while he is in the process of turning.

30th Apr 2003

The Terminator (1984)

Corrected entry: Paul Winfield's character is Ed Traxler. Lance Henriksen's character name is given only as Vukovich, but when he starts telling the story about the Afghan during Reese's interrogation, Traxler grunts "Ed, shut up." A coincidence that these two detectives who work together are both named Ed, or a mistake?

rbryant73

Correction: Out of the 6 billion people in the world. I'm sure there are two people with there names as Ed working together on any job. It does also sound like Traxler actually says: "Hey! Shut up."

26th Apr 2003

The Sixth Sense (1999)

Corrected entry: What does the ghost of the girl who was poisoned need Haley Joel for? She gets him to follow her into the bedroom, where she pushes the box containing the videotape of the poisoning to him. Well, if she can physically manipulate objects and push the box to him, why doesn't she just put the box somewhere for her dad to see? She could pick up a pen and write, "Dear Dad, Mom poisoned me, watch this tape for proof." She doesn't need him at all.

rbryant73

Correction: Her ability to move objects is probably very limited; it's one thing to move a box a short distance, another to pick up a pen and write. Also, just moving the tape to somewhere her dad would find it might not work. Her mother might have found it, or her dad might not have watched it. Cole was her best bet.

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