Apollo 13
Apollo 13 mistake picture

Visible crew/equipment: Just after Lovell secures the hatch for LM jettison, and Swigert states "Okay, pyro batts look good, I don't think we're gonna have to tie those other batteries," there is a visible bearded crew member wearing glasses and a hoodie on the lower right hand side of the screen. This is only visible in the fullscreen version. (02:01:00)

Apollo 13 mistake picture

Continuity mistake: When the astronauts are in space and are taking their equipment off, Jack Swigert removes his outer suit gloves then removes his white glove liners and tucks them into the floating suit glove, but next shot Swigert is still wearing the black suit gloves, and it then cuts to Swigert removing his helmet and he is still wearing the white glove liners.

Apollo 13 mistake picture

Visible crew/equipment: Right after the explosion, Lovell tells Houston that they've got multiple cautions and warnings, and they've got to restart, then Swigert says, "I'm going to SCS," and he flips the switch. In the next wideshot of the trio, we can see the arm and fingers of a hidden crew member wearing a short sleeve blue shirt, who's holding up a hose at the bottom right corner of the screen. This is only visible in the fullscreen version. (00:51:20)

Super Grover Premium member

Apollo 13 mistake picture

Visible crew/equipment: Immediately after the accident, when Swigert is struggling to close the hatch, as he pulls the hatch away, just before he says that he can't get it to seal, a camera is briefly visible sitting in the tunnel through to the LM. (00:52:25)

Tailkinker Premium member

Apollo 13 mistake picture

Factual error: During the launch sequence, a car that appears to be from the 1990's is parked in the background. (00:30:15)

RymoMymo

Apollo 13 mistake picture

Visible crew/equipment: During the moon landing daydream sequence, Lovell is shown performing the typical low-gravity moon walk. The thin wires used to facilitate the hopping effect can be seen at the top of the frame, and stand out against the light metal finish of the lunar lander. (01:13:30)

Vader47000

Apollo 13 mistake picture

Visible crew/equipment: During Marilyn Lovell's nightmare, the crew experiences cabin decompression. Right when the master alarm goes off, you see a piece of monofilament attached to Jim Lovell's suit hose, used to try and simulate zero G to make the hose appear to be floating. (00:13:20)

Matdan97

Factual error: When Lovell's daughter is complaining that the Beatles have broken up, she slams the album Let It Be into her rack. The scene takes place on the day of the initial explosion aboard Apollo 13, April 13 1970 - immediately prior to the Lovell family attending the screening of a television broadcast from the spacecraft. Let It Be was not released as an album until May 9th, 1970. In April Ringo was still recording drum tracks, not even possible for an advance copy to get out.

More mistakes in Apollo 13

Marilyn Lovell: Naturally, it's 13. Why 13?
Jim Lovell: It comes after 12, hon.

More quotes from Apollo 13

Trivia: The Apollo 13 mission set a record for the greatest distance from Earth ever achieved by mankind. This occurred because unlike the other Apollos, Apollo 13 did not make a burn behind the moon to drop into lunar orbit. The free-return trajectory the mission followed took the spacecraft farther behind the moon than any other mission.

More trivia for Apollo 13

Question: Why did the Apollo 13 spacecraft need a parachute? They were landing on water not solid ground. It's easier to survive a fall when landing on water, so why would they need a parachute if they were landing on water?

Answer: Spacecraft re-enter Earth's atmosphere at extremely high velocity (thousands of miles per hour). Atmospheric friction slows the spacecraft descent somewhat; but, without parachutes, the Apollo spacecraft would still reach the surface traveling at hundreds of miles per hour. Landing in water at such high speed would be like hitting concrete, which would of course be instantly fatal. Hence the necessity of multiple parachutes. The Apollo program (and all early U.S. manned space programs) chose to land in the ocean for two reasons: 1) It was easier to track spacecraft re-entry from horizon-to-horizon at sea without visual and radar obstacles, and; 2) It was faster and easier to position several Navy vessels in the general splashdown location, then deploy helicopters to rapidly retrieve the astronauts and their spacecraft.

Charles Austin Miller

More questions & answers from Apollo 13

Join the mailing list

Separate from membership, this is to get updates about mistakes in recent releases. Addresses are not passed on to any third party, and are used solely for direct communication from this site. You can unsubscribe at any time.

Check out the mistake & trivia books, on Kindle and in paperback.