Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events

Easter egg: On Full Screen DVD, go to Special Features, and then to Orphaned Scenes. To the left of the words "Dismal Deletions and Obnoxious Outtakes," there is a picture of Olaf. Right below his right hand is a wheel. Click on it, and it will take you to "Count Olaf's Ghastly Ghost Story."

Easter egg: Collector's Edition First disk: On the main menu, highlight the eye shape in the middle of the menu. Press OK and the credits scene with the Baudelaires shifts to the next part. There are several scenes to go through by pushing OK at each scene. Second disk: Go to Gruesome Galleries. Highlight Woeful World and press the right arrow. An eye should appear on the cutout of Olaf. Press OK to see a short feature entitled "Eyes are Everywhere". Second disk: On Gruesome Galleries, highlight the words Main Menu at the bottom. Press the right arrow and the swirl will light up. Press OK to see a short feature entitled "Portrait of the Artist as a Bad Man".

Lemony Snicket's A Series of Unfortunate Events mistake picture

Continuity mistake: In the scene where Count Olaf starts walking from the balcony to the stairs, you can see his right hand when he is saying "lovely home" with no writing. Later when he looks at his hand to remember Violet's name, his hand has writing on it. (00:09:20)

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Count Olaf: I must say, you're a gloomy looking bunch. Why are you so glum?
Klaus Baudelaire: Our parents just died.
Count Olaf: [nonchalantly.] Ah, yes. How very dreadful. Wait, let me do that one more time. Give me the line again while it's fresh in my mind.
Klaus Baudelaire: Our parents just died?
[Olaf pretends to be shocked.].

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Trivia: In some scenes, Klaus is taller than Violet, depite the fact that she is supposed to be two years older. The actor that plays him grew quite a lot while filming, and his costume had to be altered several times.

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Question: As we know, the magnifying glass in Olaf's tower started the Baudelaire fire. This is the same tool that Klaus uses to burn up the marriage certificate. If the magnifying glass was powerful enough to cause the Baudelaire mansion to burst into flames, which was 37 blocks away, why didn't the stage burst into flames as well?

Answer: A magnifying glass concentrates all the light that goes through it at its focal point, and it is this focal point that needs to be placed on the object which one wants to set on fire. The distance of the focal point to the lens depends on the magnifying glass characteristics, and it is more than likely that Count Olaf chose a glass where the focal point would be situated exactly "37 blocks" away from his house, that is, at the Baudelaire's mansion. When trying to set on fire an object much, much closer, the glass would concentrate much, much less energy, and would only be able to set on fire easily burnt objects, such as thin paper.

AnthonyA

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