The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring

Corrected entry: After the fellowship passed the statues of Argonath, the river ends by a huge waterfall. There's a huge rock on the very tip of the waterfall, yet the reflection is not visible on the water; compare it with the Argonath statues which have its reflections on the water.

Correction: In this shot, nothing is reflected in the water but the sky (compare the rock, Tol Brandir, to the banks to the left and right). In a later shot, Tol Brandir reflects along with everything else. Although the rock was added digitally to this footage, it's clear the filmmakers have been careful to match its reflection and general appearance to the rest of the scene.

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Corrected entry: The doorknob to Bilbo's Hobbit hole is in the center, as mentioned in the books. However, the interior doorknob is at the side of the door, in the normal place.

Correction: The door - among other things - was made to function correctly, so that it would open and shut normally. While it is unusual to have the two doorknobs in different places, the latches still work - so this is not a mistake.

Corrected entry: When Sam tried to follow Frodo (at the very end) and started drowning in the Great River, Sam was all the way under water. Frodo saved him, and then when you see that they are both in the boat again, Sam is COMPLETELY dry. Only his head is dripping wet. Frodo also reached in to save him, and Frodo's arm wasn't wet, either.

Correction: The cloaks that the Fellowship were given in Lothlorien repel water extremely well, but even so you can see that Sam's cloak is several shades darker from his immersion and it is covered with water droplets and rivulets of water running down. His shirt is also several shades darker and water can be seen running down his chest and arms as well. As for Frodo's arm and hand, both are dripping with water. The side of the cloak where he reached in to grab Sam is also covered with water droplets and is slightly darker. Claims that both hobbits are "completely dry" are ridiculous.

Corrected entry: In the scene where Arwen first appears she has her hair loose. She talks to Frodo in elvish and you see a close up of his face, then the camera goes back to her and her hair is all in little plaits.

Correction: Arwen's whole appearance changes in this scene - hairstyle, clothing etc. At first (as she is seen from Frodo's POV) her true appearance as an Elf is revealed - white, shining, perfect - and then it changes to show her in her riding clothes, looking more normal. The book refers to this happening with Elves on a number of occasions - and once or twice even with Aragorn.

Corrected entry: When the Fellowship is running through the mines of Moria, after they have fought with the orcs and cave troll, they reach the bridge of Khazad-dum. Then they are stopped again by the great number of orcs. When the Balrog arrives, they run further to Khazad-dum; the filmmakers used the exact same shot for this scene as when the Fellowship was running from the orcs in the first place.

Correction: The long shots of the Fellowship running through the Great Hall were all CG (as Peter Jackson says on his commentary on the extended DVD) and the background of columns is very repetitive, so the shots look similar, but they are not the same.

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Corrected entry: In the movie, Bilbo's book is called "There and Back Again - a Hobbit's Tale," but in the book "The Hobbit," it's "There and Back Again - A Hobbit Holiday." Maybe Peter Jackson thought audiences would misinterpret Bilbo's British use of the word "holiday"?

rbryant73

Correction: At the end of 'The Hobbit', when Bilbo is writing his memoirs, certainly it is stated that 'he THOUGHT [my emphasis] of calling them 'There and Back Again, a Hobbit's Holiday' ' - however by the end of the 'The Lord of the Rings' this has changed significantly. When Frodo has finished writing his part of the tale, he hands the book on to Sam for completion (last chapter, 'The Return of the King'), and Sam sees that 'the title page had many titles on it, crossed out one after another, so: My Diary. My Unexpected Journey. There and Back Again. And What Happened After. Adventures of Five Hobbits. The Tale of the Great Ring, compiled by Bilbo Baggins from his own observations and the accounts of his friends. What we did in the War of the Ring. Here Bilbo's hand ended and Frodo had written: The Downfall of the Lord of the Rings and the Return of the King. We can hardly blame the film-makers for avoiding all that and just keeping it simple!

Corrected entry: In the fellowship of the ring, when we first meet Legolas he has brown eyes. In the next two films the colour of his eyes alternate between being very dark blue, to icy blue.

Correction: Arwen's eyes change color too, it's an Elvish characteristic.

Nick Bylsma

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring mistake picture

Other mistake: When Sam and Frodo are in the field with the scarecrow, you can plainly see a car cruising past in the distance, from right to left. Further comment - there are two different shots which show the car moving from right to left. One starts at the top right distance, and in a shot a few seconds later the car has traveled down the road a bit and is more easily visible. Complicating matters is that the dust thrown up by the car looks similar to smoke from a chimney in the right distance, making some people think it is just the chimney. But chimneys don't move, and the smoke from the chimney is separate from the moving vehicle. [It is deleted on the DVD, but you can still see an obvious bit of image fakery on the hill just left of the smoking chimney. One can see the hill, tree, and surrounding area move up and down and shimmer slightly where someone has done a cut and paste to cover up the auto. The "car inclusive" scene appears on the National Geographic documentary, "Beyond the Movie The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring." Also, watch the music documentary on the Extended DVD - when it shows this scene the car is still in it. Bizarrely, in his commentary Peter Jackson said he never saw a car and doesn't know what people are talking about, but the production/post-production team say in their commentary that despite not thinking anyone would be able to see it, they took it out anyway.] (00:42:55)

More mistakes in The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring

Sam: Mr. Frodo's not going anywhere without me.
Elrond: No, indeed. It is hardly possible to separate you even when he is summoned to a secret Council and you are not.

More quotes from The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring

Trivia: According to the Guinness Book of Records, the Lord of the Rings holds the record for the greatest number of false feet used in one movie: 60,000.

More trivia for The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring

Question: Since Gandalf knew how dangerous the ring was, why did he give it to Frodo and tell him that he must destroy the ring? It would make more sense to either do it himself or find someone else to do it.

Answer: The temptation of the Ring is directly proportional to the power and ambition of the bearer. To someone like Gandalf - a mighty wizard who wants to save the world - the temptation would, over time, prove to be too much, and he's realistic enough to understand that about himself. With an ordinary hobbit who only wants a nice meal and some peace and quiet, the Ring has a lot less to work with.

Answer: Gandalf can't take the ring because he would be tempted to use it, and it would ultimately corrupt him. This is true for nearly anyone who has it for any length of time, except hobbits for some unknown reason. Gandalf recognized this in Bilbo, and later in Frodo.

More questions & answers from The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring

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