Mary Poppins Returns

Question: The last act of the movie revolves around the fact that the group has to get to the bank before midnight to avoid foreclosure. Since it's an impossible task, the group rides bikes to the Big Ben where Jack climbs to the top to turn the hands back. First of all, why didn't Mary simply fly the Banks straight to the bank? If she still was tight on time, why did she let Jack climb the clock tower and stare at the ordeal, thus risking his life and putting the Banks' house at risk too? She could've flown to the Big Ben herself and solve the task in a few seconds.

Sacha Premium member

New this week Answer: This is a movie where Mary Poppins flies in on an umbrella, and takes children on other-worldly adventures in a bathtub and a ceramic bowl, but you're questioning why she did something that makes no sense to you? The simplest in-universe answer is a quote from her from the first movie, there's no explanation: "First of all, I would like to make one thing quite clear... I never explain anything." Or from this movie: "One thing you should know about Mary Poppins: she never explains anything" You can't ignore the rest of her inexplicable and nonsensical acts and somehow expect sound logic and reasoning for anything she does - she did exactly what was needed for the outcome she wanted. If she knew how it would turn out, no-one (or the house) was at any risk despite appearances to the contrary - don't forget that her goal wasn't to save the house but to save the Banks family - if she'd just swooped in and used her magic to fix things in the first 5 minutes of the movie, she'd have saved the house but not the family.

sfbiker1

Answer: Jack had to turn off the lights in Big Ben first, otherwise Mary Poppins would be seen.

Answer: How do you know if she could have flown Jack to the the top of Big Ben? She may have the ability to fly with her umbrella, but that does not mean she can carry a heavy load.

raywest Premium member

She does fly to fix the clock but she waits til the very last second. The whole part is absurd.

Sacha Premium member

Question: P.L. Travers hated Disney's film adaptation of Mary Poppins so much that she refused to have Disney make any more adaptations of Mary Poppins. How could a sequel be made without the consent of Travers, especially since she died in 1996?

Answer: The short answer is *because* she died. Control then passed to her beneficiaries/estate. She didn't forbid Disney from making a sequel, and she couldn't legally prevent it either. The deal she had with Disney just meant that they had to agree on it as she had creative control, and despite their (and apparently her) best efforts, they could never find a sequel idea everyone was happy with, especially given her dislike of the original film. Her will stated: "Any payments received by my Trustees in respect of or any future commercial production or exploitation in any form whatsoever of any books I have written (including any sequel to the film "Mary Poppins") shall be held by my Trustees upon trust to distribute..." On her death creative control passed to her trustees, in terms of sequels and the stage show, and they managed to agree on a sequel idea.

Jon Sandys Premium member

Answer: Travers was never entirely opposed to having a sequel made. She initially refused Disney's sequel ideas, and attempted to impose her own demands and concept on what any additional film would be. In the 1980s, Travers and a friend wrote their own screenplay. The Disney company, now with different management, considered it but eventually dropped the project amid casting problems and other issues and conflicts that emerged. After Travers' death, Disney could then negotiate directly with Travers' estate.

raywest Premium member

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