The Shining

Question: My media studies teacher has a theory that there are no ghosts in this film and everything that Jack sees is in his imagination. He also thinks that when Wendy sees the man in the costume, it is meant to be a realisation to her that Danny may be a victim of sexual assault, from his father, Jack. He also believes that the costume is a bear and that Jack is associated with a bear throughout the film. He says that Danny may have opened the pantry door to let Jack out because he had formulated a plan to kill Jack by getting him lost in the maze. Also, the woman in 237, he thinks that there is no woman and that Jack himself hurt Danny's neck. Leading to Wendy's realisation of Jack's abusiveness. I'm not really sure if I agree with him or not. There are a lot of holes in his theory, but you never know. Just wondering if anyone would like to share their opinion and shed some light on the situation. Do you think his theory is possible?

6

Answer: The sexual assault thing is completely wrong. As far as the rest, it is highly debated. However, ghosts, I think, is the accepted answer. Some of the things that Wendy and Danny see can't be explained by Jack's psychosis. Also, the costume is suppose to be a dog. There is a whole back story to that character.

MasterOfAll
7

Question: Why did Jack type "All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy" a thousand times? In the interview, he said he was working on a new project, and I doubt that he was referring to typing the same thing over and over. Also, does Jack actually know the truth about the hotel? He implies in the breakfast scene that he's not really sure about why he feels so strongly with the hotel, but he seems to personally know the bartender and doesn't seem surprised in the gold room right before he meets Grady.

3

Answer: The hotel has a strong influence on Jack's mentality. Jack had every intention on writing a play, but once the Torrances arrived at the Overlook, the hotel began working its powers on him, affecting his mental state. During the interview, Jack was not yet under the hotel's influence because in order to achieve its true goal (to capture Danny's shining ability) it needed to get the Torrance family to the hotel first. It is strongly implied that Jack is a reincarnation and had been the hotel many years before, explaining the strong sense of deja vu he feels. It is widely believed that Jack knows Lloyd the barman and Grady from a past life, and that all of their souls are forever linked to the Overlook.

5

Question: In the book, there is a bit (I'm not sure which chapter) where Danny is in the playground and is nearly trapped in a cement tunnel with what he thinks is a demon that doesn't want him to leave,and the swings move on their own.There are also lots of bits in the book where he is chased by the hedges shaped like animals but never sees them move, just hears them.Is there a good reason why this wasn't in the film, because for me they were the scariest parts?

3

Answer: I know they cut the hedge animals simply because the special effects to make hedges move were deemed impossible to do at the time. But both of these scenes were included in the TV miniseries "Stephen King's The Shining", http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0118460/.

Twotall
1

Question: What does "All work and no play makes Jack a dull boy" mean?

ostov2
3

Chosen answer: This is a very old expression meaning that if someone, anyone, does nothing but work all the time and never takes time for recreation or relaxation, they will become a dull, uninspired person. Jack, the main character, is twisting the expression in a malevolent way as his mind and body are being taken over by evil ghosts. It's origin was from typing classes, used as a sample phrase for children to articulate movement across the keyboard.

raywest Premium member
6

Question: Why exactly is this film (and the book it was based upon) called "The Shining"?

1

Answer: It refers to the "gift" that Danny and Mr. Halloran shared as in this quote from Mr. Halloran: "I can remember when I was a little boy, my grandmother and I could hold conversations entirely without ever opening our mouths. She called it shining."

Ingabritzen
2

Question: Why is the supposed foreign version of the Shining with the deleted ending impossible to find? Does anybody have this version or know how to get it? I have a feeling it's an elaborate Internet rumor and does not actually exist.

????
1

Chosen answer: Stanley Kubrick changed the ending of The Shining after it had been in theatres for about three days. About ten minutes of footage was removed. The full US theatrical version runs 145mins, everywhere else 115mins after Kubrick trimmed the movie to remove what he considered "unnecessary" scenes. There is no specific "foreign version" save for cuts any TV networks may make for transmission.

Neil Jones
2

Answer: In addition, the footage is impossible to find because Kubrick had all of the unused footage destroyed. You can read about it here https://ew.com/movies/2017/03/30/shining-ending-explained/.

Question: Did the Grady girls also possess the shining? Did they die for the same reasons the hotel tries to get Jack to kill his family?

2

Answer: It is possible that one of the daughters may have had a "shine" to her. If you'll remember the exchange in the bathroom between Jack and Grady, Grady says that one of his daughters stole some matches and tried to burn the Overlook down. It's possible she did this because she could sense the evil in the hotel and attempted to end it. It's possible, also, that she realised what the hotel was doing to her father and tried to end that.

14

Answer: The Grady girls did not possess the shining. They were murdered by their father, because the hotel drove him crazy, just like what happened to Jack.

lionhead

Question: Has anyone ever tried zooming in on the various photographs on the walls of The Overlook, other than the final scene one? I bet Kubrick has placed crazy details in those too.

Answer: The pictures in Danny's room are pictures of bears. Going along with the motif of bears throughout the film.

Question: One of the corrected entries here says that the film was shot entirely at Elstree Studios in England. Why? I mean with all the possible locations in the US especially Hollywood and all the facilities they have there, why was the entire film shot in England?

pierpp
1

Chosen answer: Many major US-financed films have been shot in England. Parts of the original Star Wars trilogy, the Indiana Jones opening sequence, the first three Alien films and a great many others were all shot in the UK. The rationale is often financial - it can simply be cheaper to make films outside the US, with Australia being another common choice. In Kubrick's case, part of the rationale may well have been financial, but he also had a fear of flying, so made all his films from 1962's Lolita onwards in the UK, where he lived. Exterior shots in the film were shot at Mount Hood in Oregon and Lake Louise in Alberta.

Tailkinker Premium member
2

Question: Are the ghosts real, or does Jack just imagine them?

Socks1000
1

Chosen answer: The ghosts are real.

raywest Premium member
3

Answer: Both Kubrick and King stated there were ghosts in interviews so as they are essentially the creators I would say there are.

In all fairness, Kubrick, unlike King, leaves the existence of ghosts somewhat questionable. The whole thing can just as well be just Jack succumbing to cabin fever: he loathes his family, and the long isolation just pushes him over the brink. Wendy witnesses the ghosts, too, yes, but she could also be suffering from cabin fever, not to mention the stress of her husband finally going insane, and trying to murder her and her child. In short, the whole existence of ghosts is a lot more ambiguous in the movie.

Jukka Nurmi

Question: What is the significance of the play that Jack is writing, in both the book and movie?

Answer: Jack, who lost his teaching job due to his alcoholism and violent temper, is attempting to rebuild his life as a writer and working at the hotel gives him the financial means to do that. As the ghosts begin taking over Jack's mind, he is increasingly unable to work on the play. As he mentally deteriorates, the play's progress (or lack of) gauges his mental decline.

raywest Premium member
3

Question: Early in the film the hotel manager mentions that the Overlook was built on an old Indian burial ground and that builders had to repel several Indian attacks during construction. Indian attacks? During the 20th century? And why mention this detail, since it was never mentioned again or became part of the story.

Answer: "Indian attacks" just means attacked by Indians who owned the land. It does not necessarily mean Indians with warpaint/horses/etc., just that the attack came from the tribe who owned the land. As for him mentioning it to Jack, he is just giving him a brief history of the Overlook Hotel, as Jack will be the caretaker and might want to know about the history surrounding the Overlook.

Jazetopher
1

Question: How was Stanley Kubrick able to ensure that Danny Lloyd never found out that he was really in a horror movie? In the scene when Wendy accuses Jack of hurting Danny, she holds onto Danny and calls Jack a "son of a bitch." And what about when Danny sees the twin sisters? He looked terrified after seeing them.

1

Answer: Obviously, Danny Lloyd did eventually learn that "The Shining" was a horror film. During production, however, Stanley Kubrick only told Danny that the movie was a drama about a family living in a hotel. The single shot with Danny and the twin sisters in the corridor never showed anything particularly horrifying; Danny was simply looking straight into the camera and reacting to Kubrick's instructions.

Charles Austin Miller
4

Question: How does Danny not suffer from the cold and freeze to death like Jack does when they are running through the maze near the end?

1

Answer: Jack got lost, running around in the maze for much longer than Danny was, chasing his own footsteps. Danny felt the cold, but didn't spend more then a few minutes outside, hiding close to the exit and escaping pretty quickly.

lionhead
1

Question: If it is really like what Dick said "It's just like reading a book", or that the spirits in the hotel don't have a physical existence, how did Danny get the bruises on his neck from the lady in the bathtub? I also don't understand the transformation in Danny's' character, I do understand that at that point he was taken over by his imaginary friend, but what actually happened to the real Danny?

1

Answer: Hallorann is just trying to reassure Danny so he won't be afraid, even though he (Hallorann) knows it's not the truth. This is why he so adamantly orders Danny not to go to Room 237. And Danny isn't so much ¨taken over¨ by Tony, so much as he suffers an extremely traumatic experience (being strangled by a naked, undead old woman) and goes into a state of extreme shock, through which he communicates as Tony (the personification of his shining power). He snaps back to reality when Jack tries to murder him and Wendy.

Question: Why does Danny constantly repeat the phrase "Redrum" once Tony has taken over him?

Answer: Redrum is murder spelled backwards.

Grumpy Scot
2

Answer: He repeats it louder and louder in order to wake up his mother, to warn her that Jack is on his way and intends to kill them.

Question: Why do the ghosts want Jack to kill his family?

Socks1000

Chosen answer: The Ghosts want Jack to kill Danny because the shining is what gives the Hotel power. The only way Danny's shine would stay permanently at the Hotel would be for him to die there. The only reason Jack was chosen was because he was the weakest link to get to Danny.

11

Question: Just before Jack enters the gold room, he passes in front of several mirrors (three or four) and his reflection is not present on the last one, but seeing that the angle does not change, one would expect to see him pass. The question is therefore the following: what happens at this precise moment, between the last and the penultimate mirror? Should there be a change in reality? A moment when Jack switches to the past? Or anything else?

Answer: I'm not sure which scene you're referring to: when he first enters the Gold Room and finds Lloyd alone, or when he enters and finds the ball in progress. In the latter, we do indeed see his reflection...due to the angles of the shot and the mirror itself, it happens as Jack is still behind the Gold Room sign. In the former, we do not see his reflection, but it's because the shot is much tighter on Jack Nicholson, and so, the mirror in question is not visible in the shot until after the point where we would see him in it.

Continuity mistake: While breaking down the bathroom door with the axe, Jack repeatedly strikes and damages the right hand panel, but as he turns away from the door (when he hears the snow-cat) both left and right panels have been damaged.

More mistakes in The Shining

Jack Torrance: Wendy, let me explain something to you. Whenever you come in here and interrupt me, you're breaking my concentration. You're distracting me. And it will then take me time to get back to where I was. You understand?
Wendy Torrance: Yeah.
Jack Torrance: Now, we're going to make a new rule. When you come in here and you hear me typing [types], or whether you DON'T hear me typing, or whatever the FUCK you hear me doing, when I'm in here, it means that I am working. THAT means don't come in. Now, do you think you can handle that?
Wendy Torrance: Yeah.
Jack Torrance: Good. Now why don't you start right now and get the fuck out of here?

More quotes from The Shining

Trivia: Stanley Kubrick was very protective of Danny Lloyd, because he was so young. Through some careful and clever directing, Lloyd was unaware he was making a horror film until after the film's release.

More trivia for The Shining

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