Fury

Fury (2014)

4 suggested corrections

(8 votes)

Factual error: In the hedgerow battle, the Fury tank platoon face off with a German MG 42 machine gun and two 7.5 cm Pak 40 anti-tank gun. Each of these guns opens fire only after the previous one gets knocked out. In a real combat situation, all of the guns would open fire at the same time and establish a cross fire, effectively suppressing the ground troops and tanks from advancing. (00:31:35 - 00:33:30)

Yue Hin Yeung

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Suggested correction: By the time the movie takes place (mid to late April 1945) the German army was mostly inexperienced troops with an incredibly small nucleus of veterans. Though the tactical use of weapon systems you mention is correct, I doubt most of the formations still putting up a fight in Germany proper would have had the knowledge/ability to carry it out.

With low experience I would expect the soldiers to open fire too soon and with no communication between guns to create the "talking gun" effect. The fact that the two guns opened fire separate of each other makes very little tactical sense regardless of skill or experience.

With no experience it is more likely they would open fire as the 1st guns fires. With all 3 stations opening fire they would have had more chance to succeed.

Ssiscool Premium member

Factual error: One scene has Sgt. Collier having a conversation with Norman as they are riding on the turret of "Fury" without their tank intercom throat mikes and headphones. The noise of the moving tank alone would cause any conversation to be a shouting match between the two soldiers. Further, they are in column with three other noisy tanks, which would make a casual conversation even more difficult without utilizing their tank intercom system. (01:14:20)

Scott215

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Suggested correction: You can talk on a moving tank. It's not a 747.

Yes, unknown poster, you can talk on a moving tank, as I have done it many times. But on the old WW2 Shermans, talking at a conversation decibel level would be difficult without throat mikes and intercoms. They were not quiet like my old M1 Abrams tank.

Scott215

Factual error: The film shows the American and German tanks firing at each other on the move. Tank warfare doctrine dictated that tanks must be stationary when shooting at a target, to ensure a hit. Some tanks were equipped with stabilizers on their guns to allow firing on the move. All the tanks in "Fury" (German and American) were not so equipped. (01:17:15)

Scott215

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Suggested correction: The Sherman was one of the first widely produced tanks to feature a gyroscopic stabilized gun and sight. The stabilization was only in the vertical plane, as the mechanism could not slew the turret. The stabilizer was sufficient to keep the gun within 1/8th of a degree, or 2 mils while crossing moderately rough terrain at 15 miles an hour. This gave a hit probability of 70% on enemy tanks at ranges of 300 to 1200 yards. Yes they did fire on the move, although very slowly.

Suggested correction: This entry is half right. German tank Doctrine dictated that vehicles come to a halt before firing. US Army manuals from the period state that if you are out ranged you charge while firing on the move. All of the M4 variants in the film have single axis stabilization systems and by the point in the war depicted in the film were trained to use it.

Stupidity: As the position of the Tiger was perpendicular to the Sherman platoon's line of march, and they were advancing across totally open country with firm ground all around, it didn't matter a hill of beans whether they shot the first or the last tank in the column.

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Suggested correction: A somewhat valid point. Yes they were in open ground and so it wouldn't matter who they targeted but In the situation shown, the Tiger should have hit the lead tank as that's the commanders tank and a more valuable target than the rear tank.

Ssiscool Premium member

Suggested correction: You really didn't explain the context here. Was there a big discussion of which tank to shoot first?

The mistake is saying that the tank column was travelling through an open field. It wouldn't matter if Tiger 131 hit the lead or rear tank in the column as they could manoeuvre around the disabled tank. A somewhat valid point.

Ssiscool Premium member

You missed the point of the correction. Is it shown in the movie that they specifically targeted the first tank?

Factual error: During the final battle, Gordo the tank driver calls out, "Panzerfaust, four o'clock!", as he looks through his periscope. He could not have seen any targets at four o'clock, as the driver's periscope could barely rotate towards the eleven and one o'clock positions, close to the left and right front corners of the tank's hull. The four o'clock position would be near the right rear of the tank.

Scott215

More mistakes in Fury

Wardaddy: It will end, soon. But before it does, a lot more people have to die.

More quotes from Fury

Trivia: The Tiger tank used in the battle with Fury is an actual German Tiger tank that was captured by British forces in North Africa in 1943. Its original turret number is 131, meaning the tank is from the 1st company, 3rd platoon, 1st tank, which was the platoon leader's vehicle.

Scott215

More trivia for Fury

Question: Why did Gordo bring up the horse thing at breakfast?

Answer: Gordo was making a point to Norman that the crew of the "Fury" had seen some horrible things during the Battle of the Falaise Pocket. After wiping out an entire German army there, they were tasked with putting wounded horses out of their misery. The point was that Norman was not there, and did not experience what they had, so Norman could not judge the tank crew's actions.

Scott215

Gordo brought up the horse thing because him and the other (original) crew members were not happy with Don and Norman enjoying a nice, quiet meal without them. He even say's "You weren't there" meaning Don sharing this with Norman when he hadn't yet been through much war time like all of them had, together. They also say "We weren't invited", "Why weren't we invited." The horse story was to get at Don for not inviting them and sharing it only with Norman.

More questions & answers from Fury

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